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Month: April 2018

Birthday of Route 66 Celebration Next Monday Afternoon

Birthday of Route 66 Celebration Next Monday Afternoon

Photo of the Birthplace of Route 66 signOn the afternoon of Friday, April 30, 1926, while a large Rotary convention was in town, Cyrus Avery and John Page from Oklahoma, along with B. H. Piepmeier and probably John T. Woodruff from Missouri, met in the Colonial Hotel, located in the southwest quadrant of the corner of East St. Louis Street and Jefferson Avenue near the central square in Springfield, Missouri, to try to resolve a months-long disagreement with the federal government and other states concerning what number should be assigned to a proposed federal highway from Chicago, Illinois to Los Angeles, California. They decided to recommend the number 66. At approx. 4:00 p.m. Avery and Piepmeier sent a telegram to Washington DC indicating their new preference.

On Monday afternoon, April 30, 2018, from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m., interested members of the university, community, and region will meet at the corner of Jefferson and East St. Louis, under the Birthplace of Route 66 sign (not under the Big W — obscure movie reference) to celebrate Route 66’s 92nd birthday with cake, punch, postcards, conversation, selfies, and a grand prize to the best selfie with the sign. Remarks will be made at 4:00 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the MSU Libraries and OzarksAlive.com, with encouragement from the Birthplace of Route 66 Festival Planning Committee.

Dead Day Party

Dead Day Party

Photo of Room 301 in Duane G. Meyer LibraryThe end-of-semester “Dead Day” party will be held on Friday, May 11, 2018 from 11:30 a.m. CDT to 1:00 p.m. CDT in LIBR 301 (“Club 301” — newly re-carpeted and refurnished) on the Third Level of Duane G. Meyer Library. Hot pizza and cool, refreshing beverages (non-alcoholic) will be provided by the Libraries using private funds. Attendees are encouraged to bring a side dish and/or dessert to share. Attendees also are encouraged to bring their own non-disposable plates, cups, and eating utensils. The kitchen sink with dish washing liquid will be available before, during, and after this event, so you can clean up your own dishes and utensils.

Graduating student employees will be honored with a gift from the Libraries.

Attendees also are encouraged to bring non-perishable food items and/or personal care items to donate as a group to Ozarks Food Harvest. Significant others of current employees, as well as retired employees, are welcome to attend.

Spotlight on Special Collections: The Robert Wallace Collection

Spotlight on Special Collections: The Robert Wallace Collection

Photo of the poet Robert WallaceThe Robert Wallace Collection (M 1) in Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives features a large amount of material about author Robert Wallace and his publishing company Bits Press.
Robert Wallace (1932-1999) was a Springfield native who started writing poems around the age of ten.  When he was sixteen his humorous poem “Tee Hee,” about his experiences as a golf caddy, was published in The Rotarian magazine.  He graduated from Springfield High (now Central High School) and went on to Harvard (A.B. in English, 1953) and Cambridge (B.A. in English, 1955) before serving two years in the U.S. Army. His first book, This Various World and Other Poems, was published by Scribner’s in 1957. 
In the late 1950s and early 1960s, he taught at Bryn Mawr College, Sweet Briar College, and Vassar College, before settling at Case Western Reserve University from 1965 until his death in 1999.  During his time at Case Western, he published several more books and started his Bits Press in 1974, which published chapbooks and collections of poetry from authors such as Wallace’s former classmate, John Updike.  
This collection includes thousands of letters from contemporary poets, most notably a significant amount of material from John Updike, several letters from Richard Wilbur, and one from William Carlos Williams.  The bulk of the collection is correspondence with Bits contributors.  The collection also includes manuscripts of poems, both those written by Wallace and those submitted to or published by Bits.  For many of Wallace’s poems, all drafts of the poems are included. 
A second donation from the estate of Robert Wallace (Robert Wallace Collection Part 2 (M 77)) contains additional material, including family correspondence and history.
For more information see the collection’s finding aid or contact Special Collections and Archives.
Reptile Day at the Fairbanks Another Huge Success

Reptile Day at the Fairbanks Another Huge Success

Photo of an older woman and children handling a snakeA total of 524 people attended Reptile Day at the Fairbanks School last Saturday. Amy Hankins from the MSU Libraries, who coordinated this great event, made 600 buttons to distribute, and she almost ran out! Several media representatives were in attendance. A media student from Drury made a film for a class project. KY3 showed up and interviewed Christopher Scioli who brings his 9.5 foot python, Enoch, every time we host a Reptile Day.
Everyone had so much fun. Several people came in terrified of snakes, and were able to overcome their fears, leaving with a new respect for snakes. Big thanks to the Herpetological Society members who helped out, and they provided realistic models of native snakes for our display. We have turned them into a game: “guess the native snake” (they are VERY realistic) and the people who guess correctly get a prize, a Snakes of Missouri poster. Enoch was tired, but happy.
E-Resource Spotlight: Encyclopedia of Pollution

E-Resource Spotlight: Encyclopedia of Pollution

Photo of a polluted landscapeAs the online version of a two-volume, 2011 edition, the Encyclopedia of Pollution is designed to address all aspects of pollution and the global impact on the environment in a single source. Containing more than 300 entries and essays, it uses the most current scientific data to explain the different types of pollutants, including properties, production, uses, environmental release and fate, adverse health response to exposure, and environmental regulations on human exposure. It provides the scientific background on the water, soil, and air of environments where the pollutants are released.

Coverage also includes pollution regulation, the function of federal regulatory agencies and environmental advocacy groups, and the technology and methods to reduce pollution and to remediate existing pollution problems. Numerous case studies explore the most infamous of pollution events such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the Gulf Storm oil well fires, the Chernobyl disaster, Hurricane Katrina, the World Trade Center disaster, and the Love Canal in New York, among many others, including those that had great impact on legislation or that were used in popular media such as the films Erin Brockovich and A Civil Action. Biographies are provided of some of the leaders and pioneers of pollution study and activism. Other useful features include a detailed glossary, indexes, a timeline, and tables.

Second Printing of Living Ozarks Anthology Already in Preparation

Second Printing of Living Ozarks Anthology Already in Preparation

Cover of the Living Ozarks AnthologyEven though the Living Ozarks anthology has been out less than two weeks, a second printing already is being planned and prepared. The professors of several courses to be taught later this year have expressed interest in adopting the anthology as a text. Beginning this fall the University of Arkansas Press will handle distribution, sales (including online sales), fulfillment, and related services for the publication of the Ozarks Studies Institute, an initiative of the MSU Libraries. To help prepared for the second printing, several people are giving the first printing a careful proofreading, looking for any remaining typos, errors, and other infelicities. Two retired former Deans of the MSU Libraries — Neosha Mackey and Karen Horny — as well as Linda Robertson are donating their time and talent to this effort. Thanks!

Spotlight on Special Collections: The Marshall Gordon Papers

Spotlight on Special Collections: The Marshall Gordon Papers

A red felt heartThe Marshall Gordon Papers (RG 1/7) in Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives come from Dr. Marshall Gordon, who served as the president of Southwest Missouri State University (now Missouri State University) from 1983 to 1992. His presidency resulted in numerous achievements, such as the recruitment of National Merit Scholars, new residence halls, and the AACSB accreditation of the College of Business Administration; but it was also marked with controversies such as the production of The Normal Heart in 1989 and the Juanita K. Hammons Hall for the Performing Arts construction cost issues in 1992.  This collection consists of scrapbooks documenting Dr. Gordon’s presidency, as well as his collection of correspondence, petitions, and clippings related to the production of The Normal Heart. With its focus on AIDS, Larry Kramer’s play raised significant controversy in the community at the time.

See the collection’s finding aid for more information, or contact Special Collections and Archives.

Student Employee of the Month: Jacob Hollback

Student Employee of the Month: Jacob Hollback

Photo of Jacob HollbackThe MSU Libraries’ Student Employee of the Month for April 2018 is Jacob Hollback. A Geography major, Jacob works in the Circulation area of Duane G. Meyer Library. His favorite book is The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams. When asked what he wished students knew about the MSU Libraries, Jacob noted, “One thing that students may not be very aware of is that the Music and Media Department has a new VR headset and Hololens that you can use in the library. A very cool and exciting resource!” Thanks, Jacob, for all you do to make the MSU Libraries a great place.

New Microwave for the Vending Machine Area

New Microwave for the Vending Machine Area

Photo of a woman taking a photo of a microwave ovenA new microwave has been purchased and installed in the vending machine area in the main lobby of MSU’s Duane G. Meyer Library. The gross old microwave has been relegated to the dustbin of history As soon as word of the new microwave began to spread, the paparazzi quickly congregated (see photo). In honor of the new machine, and National Haiku Poetry Day, Melissa Eiken composed the following haiku:

 

A New Beginning

What once made us cringe

Corroded and gross no more

Warms your heart and meal.

 

#NationalHaikuPoetryDay

#MeyerMicrowave

What Do UNESCO, Slovenia, Berlin, and the Ozarks Have in Common?

What Do UNESCO, Slovenia, Berlin, and the Ozarks Have in Common?

Map of the Ozarks RegionA researcher and author from Arkansas recently contacted us with a request to use the map of the Ozarks region created by the MSU Maps and GIS area in an upcoming international publication:

I am currently writing an article for an edited series entitled Flower World: Music Archaeology of the Americas Vol. 6, edited by Mark Howell and Matthias Stockli, published by Ekho Verlag, Berlin. The title of the article is “A Survey and Analysis of Sound-Making Artifacts from Bluff Shelter Sites in the Ozark Plateau Region of the Central United States.” The article is based on a paper I presented last August at a symposium in Ljubljana, Slovenia sponsored by The International Council for Traditional Music Study Group on Music Archaeology, a UNESCO affiliated organization. Most of the audience for this publication will be European and Latin American (some of the articles are published in Spanish). For this reason I want to provide them with a good map of the Ozarks and I would like to ask your permission to use the map which appears on the web site of the Ozark Studies Institute to accompany the article.