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Month: June 2018

Furnishings for the New Duane G. Meyer Library “Den” on Order

Furnishings for the New Duane G. Meyer Library “Den” on Order

Birdseye rendering of the new Meyer Library denMembers of the Space Committee of the MSU Libraries have been working long and hard with representatives from MSU’s Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Scott Rice Office Works, and Steelcase to select furnishings for the new “den” being established at the top of the main interior ramp into the First Level of MSU’s Duane G. Meyer Library. The furnishings now are on order. Funding for this particular phase of the multi-year library renovation project has been made possible in part through a generous commitment for major financial support from the Martin Family Foundation.

The image at right is a bird’s eye rendering of the new space, looking south toward the fountain. The newly renovated space will feature new carpeting, lots of soft furniture, a new area to display new books, and even a faux fireplace. Renovation work already is underway and should be completed in early August at the latest, before the start of the fall semester.

SPS Explore! Students Visit

SPS Explore! Students Visit

Photo of special collections materialsEarlier this month, the Special Collections and Archives unit of the Missouri State University Libraries  hosted middle-school students from the Springfield Public School’s Explore! program.  This summer program allows students and their parents to select from a wide variety of courses tailored to spark their imagination and challenge their intellect.  The 7th grade students who visited Meyer Library learned more about African American history in the Ozarks. Archivists from MSU’s Special Collections and from the State Historical Society of Missouri met with the students, showing them photographs and documents from this area, as well as explaining the importance of preserving history.  This is the second year we have participated in this SPS program and we’re looking forward to two more classes visiting in July.

E-Resource Spotlight: Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture

E-Resource Spotlight: Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture

Cover of the Encyclopedia of Latin American History and CultureThe electronic version of the 6-volume print set provides a comprehensive, multidisciplinary view of Latin American history and culture from prehistoric times to the present. It covers cultural issues and includes numerous biographical profiles of important figures in politics, letters, and the arts. The second edition of the Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture is a monumental work and represents the best of scholarship on Latin America.  This edition incorporates new material in substantial ways. It includes 568 new entries, expanding the total number of articles to 5824. Of the 3322 biographies, 366 are new and the rest have been revised, replaced, or updated. Debuting in this edition are eight new “Mega Essays,” authored by renowned specialists and featuring such important themes as “Democracy,” “Economic Development,” “Hispanics in the United States,” and “Race and Ethnicity” in articles of up to 10,000 words.

Special Collections Spotlight: Library Services Record Group

Special Collections Spotlight: Library Services Record Group

Photo of the old library main reading roomThe Library Services Record Group (RG 3/6) in Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives represents the history of library services at Missouri State University, including photographs, meeting minutes, financial records, reports, and more, dating back to the 1919.

The library began with 600 volumes in 1905 as a part of the Missouri State Normal School #4.  It moved into the north wing of the new academic building (Carrington Hall) in 1909 and by 1912 its collection had grown to 12,000 volumes.  An article in the Southwest Standard praised the library’s service but lamented that it still needed more books.

By 1924 the library work force consisted of two librarians, one staff and 22 student assistants.  In 1940 the library contained 50,000 volumes and employed five librarians, 20 student assistants and 20 National Youth Administration students. The next year plans were drawn for a $128,000 art-deco style library to be built through the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.).  To the disappointment of the campus community, World War II halted the project before it received W.P.A. approval.  Finally, construction began in 1954 on a $600,000 library building, designed to hold 150,000 volumes, provide seating for 2,400, and include a foreign language lab and faculty reading room.  The new Memorial Library (later Cheek Hall) had an air-conditioned first floor and was dedicated in November of 1955.

In 1960 staff included six professional librarians and approximately 30 student assistants.  That same year the library became a United States Government Document Depository. By 1975 the library collection had grown to 270,000 volumes and 207,000 microform units.  By this time, library personnel included 15 librarians and 17 staff and the status and name of the college had changed to university.

In 1978 $6.8 million was allocated for construction, equipment and furnishings for a new library building, which was dedicated in September of 1980. In 1982 the Board of Regents named the library in honor of retiring MSU President Duane G. Meyer.  The library celebrated the acquisition of its 500,000th volume, a facsimile of the Gutenberg Bible, in 1990.  By 1995, the library contained 586,900 volumes and 844,000 microform units.  In 2000 Meyer Library was named as an official United Nations Depository.

As of 2001, the year this collection was processed as well as the year the Meyer Library building was extensively renovated and added onto, the items in MSU’s libraries numbered over 2.9 million including volumes, subscriptions to periodicals and newspapers, extensive back files of journals and newspapers, audiovisual materials, and government documents and maps.

For more information, or for access to unprocessed material collected since 2001, contact Special Collections and Archives.

Libraries Collaborates on Springfield Premiere of Documentary Film

Libraries Collaborates on Springfield Premiere of Documentary Film

Next Thursday evening, June 28th, is the big Springfield premiere of a feature-length documentary about Springfield’s rich musical heritage.

Hoekstra Documentary flierDave Hoekstra, a media person (Sun-Times and WGN) and author from Chicago, is the producer, and Abbey Waterworth, a local singer and musician (and a student employee in the MSU Libraries), is the associate producer. The event at the Fox Theater on the Square is free and open to all. No tickets required.

The event is being hosted by the History Museum on the Square and sponsored by Ozarks Alive, Music Mondays of the Ozarks, and the Ozarks Studies Institute, an initiative of the MSU Libraries. Light refreshments and a cash bar from the Hotel Vandivort will be available. Doors will open at 5:30. Musical entertainment will be presented by Abbey Waterworth, followed by a brief panel discussion with various luminaries, then the screening of the 90-minute documentary at 7:00 p.m. 
New Terrazzo Graces First Level of Duane G. Meyer Library

New Terrazzo Graces First Level of Duane G. Meyer Library

Photo of terrazzo flooringThis week a crew from Missouri Terrazzo has been working on the terrazzo flooring on the main First Level of the Duane G. Meyer Library on the Springfield campus of Missouri State University. They are filling and squaring off gaps in the flooring near the new RIS Commons as well as near the forthcoming new living room or den, made possible through generous support from Don and Ruth Martin. Once the terrazzo is finished, the rest of the carpeting in that area will be replaced. The walls are being patched and repainted, and new furniture is on order. The goal is to have this project completed by early August.

Local, Collaborative Plans for the PBS Great American Read

Local, Collaborative Plans for the PBS Great American Read

Great American Read logoIn May PBS began a new television series called the Great American Read. Quoting from the project’s FaceBook page: “THE GREAT AMERICAN READ, a new eight-part television competition and nationwide campaign, explores the power of books and the joy of reading through the lens of America’s 100 best-loved novels. Vote for your favorites before the series returns this fall.”

The MSU Libraries is partnering with other organizations to plan a series of events around this national public campaign. Preliminary planning discussions are underway with the MSU English Department, OPTV, KSMU, and other interested organizations. Some of the ideas discussed to date:

(1) a series of trivia nights (focused on the 100 novels) held at public libraries in the summer, culminating in a trivia night hosted at MSU in the fall;
(2) a “Great Ozarks Read” in which public libraries would encourage patrons to vote for their favorite book from the list of 100; and
(3) a film festival at the Moxie featuring movies based on a handful of the 100 novels. 
Summer Issue of Public Affairs Lens has been Released

Summer Issue of Public Affairs Lens has been Released

Public Affairs Lens mastheadThe summer issue of the e-publication called Public Affairs Lens has been released. In this second issue there is a staff highlight about Shannon Conlon in Interlibrary Loan, an article about change, and an article about a new book examining libraries and homelessness. In a video embedded in that article, the author “Ryan Dowd (Director of Hesed House, Chicago) shares advice on taking a more empathetic approach toward homeless individuals.”

Public Affairs Lens is a publication of the Public Affairs Committee of the Missouri State Libraries. In each e-newsletter, we celebrate the accomplishments of our library employees focusing on the three pillars of MSU’s Public Affairs Mission: Ethical Leadership, Cultural Competency, and Community Engagement.

E-Resource Spotlight: Wall Street Journal

E-Resource Spotlight: Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal logoThe online, full-text Eastern edition of the Wall Street Journal newspaper is available from January 2, 1984 to today — over 34 years of coverage. Wire service articles are not included, nor are most financial data that appear in the print edition. Full text is online in html format only, with PDF downloads available. Meyer Library also has the Wall Street Journal on microfilm from Feb. 1959-Dec. 2009.

Special Collections Spotlight: Ozarks Jewish Archives

Special Collections Spotlight: Ozarks Jewish Archives

Cover of Ozarks Jewish CookbookThe Ozarks Jewish Archives (M 43) in Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives contains material from the local Jewish community dating back to 1924.  It includes items about Temple Israel (the first synagogue in Springfield, Missouri), oral histories, and information related generally to Jewish activity in the Ozarks.

By the late 19th century there was a small community of Jewish people living in the Ozarks.  In 1893, they organized Temple Israel, and during the early 20th century, the community grew large enough to split into two congregations: Temple Israel and Sha’are Zedek.  During World War II, however, financial constraints forced the groups to cooperate regularly, and after the war they merged, forming the United Hebrew Congregations.

For more information, see the collection’s finding aid or contact Special Collections and Archives.