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Month: August 2018

Fostering a Love of Reading in Preschoolers

Fostering a Love of Reading in Preschoolers

Photo of Cherri Jones reading to preschoolersTo further foster their love of reading and books, students from MSU’s Child Development Center visit the Infant Through Grade 12 Resources area (IG12) of the MSU Libraries. In the photo at right, Cherri Jones, Professor of Information Science and Head of IG12, reads to Kaye Clark’s class as enthusiastic preschoolers help her out. IG12 is located on the Second Level of Duane G. Meyer Library on the Springfield campus of Missouri State University.

Testing Center Improvements

Testing Center Improvements

Photo of the MSU Testing CenterThe Testing Center has several new improvements for this fall:

  • 66 new computers, replacing the older ones
  • 5 iPads, for e-texts, customer satisfaction survey, and check-in purposes
  • A Take-a-Number system for busy times
  • COMING SOON: NetSupport School, software to enable remote observation of computer workstations

Test candidates should know that Friday afternoons between 12 PM and 6 PM are our busiest times; they may wish to consider coming during our lower traffic periods, such as Sundays, Saturdays, or Mondays.  Afternoons between 12 – 6 PM are high traffic times on all days except Sundays.

New exams also have been added:

  1. Certiport – Microsoft Office Specialist and Microsoft Technology Associate, among others. Certiport professional accreditation exams are free to full-time employees of Missouri State. Please contact Sue McCrory for more information.
  2. National Testing Network – certifications for public safety officers such as police, fire, and dispatch.
  3. TEAS – nursing program entry exam
Kanopy Streaming Media Service Now Available Through Pilot Program

Kanopy Streaming Media Service Now Available Through Pilot Program

Kanopy logoThe Library now offers Kanopy, a streaming video service accessible to all MSU faculty, staff, and students through a Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) pilot program.  How it works:  Kanopy will trigger our purchase of unlimited access to a film for a year once the film has been viewed more than four times.  Our subscription to the Kanopy service covers subject areas including the Arts, Business, Global studies, Media/Communications, General Sciences, and Social Sciences.  Specific titles not covered by our subscription may be requested for library purchase through the Kanopy interface.  Many films have closed captioning and transcripts and can be embedded in courseware or used for viewing in the classroom.  Users can access Kanopy on and off-campus through the library list of e-resources or through the library catalog with an MSU login.

The New Student Welcome Party a Big Success

The New Student Welcome Party a Big Success

Photo of Thor superhero impersonatorThe New Student Welcome Party, held in Duane G. Meyer Library last Friday, was a huge success. Students and instructors of GEP 101 (General Education Program) & UHC 110 (University Honors College) arrived in droves to explore the library, enjoy FREE pizza and soda, and to register to win great prizes! Thor and other superheroes made appearances. The DJ did a great with the music. When dancing breaks out, you know it’s a good welcome party.

E-Resource Spotlight: Humanities International Complete

E-Resource Spotlight: Humanities International Complete

Humanities International Complete logoHumanities International Complete provides over 920 full-text journals and magazines, more than 780 full-text peer-reviewed journals, books and other published humanities sources from around the world. It includes all data from Humanities International Index plus unique full-text content, much of which is not available in other databases. Humanities International Complete is an essential resource for students, researchers, and educators interested in all aspects of the humanities, with worldwide content pertaining to literary, scholarly, and creative thought. Humanities International Complete is a valuable collection for libraries looking to provide comprehensive coverage of the humanities with full-text content.

 

MSU Libraries Represent at Showcase on Teaching and Learning

MSU Libraries Represent at Showcase on Teaching and Learning

Photo of Jan Johnson at ShowcaseThe MSU Libraries were well represented at the 33rd Showcase on Teaching and Learning held on Wednesday, August 15. The Libraries had a table promoting library liaisons, the new faculty lounge,and the newly named A.S.P.I.R.E. Faculty that stopped by were able to learn more about the new interdisciplinary space and could enter to win pastries and coffee in the new faculty lounge. Fortunately, the Libraries table was located next to a presentation room in which Professor Ridwan Sakidja, with assistance from Jan Johnson, demonstrated a Hololens app that he and others developed using library-provided equipment. And just around the corner was a table promoting the MSU Testing Center, administered and run by the MSU Libraries. 

New ASPIRE Service Receives $10,000 Grant from BNSF

New ASPIRE Service Receives $10,000 Grant from BNSF

ASPIRE bannerThe new ASPIRE Service on the Third Level of Duane G. Meyer Library on the Springfield campus of Missouri State University has received a $10,000 grant from BNSF (Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad). BNSF funds will be used to provide furnishings conducive to collaborative learning experiences. Jan Johnson, the Libraries employee who has provided much of the vision and energy in developing ASPIRE, is the principal investigator on this grant-funded project.

The creation of the ASPIRE  interdisciplinary space within the library provides opportunities for students and faculty members from multiple disciplines to work on real-life issues to develop potential solutions. ASPIRE supports the State of Missouri’s current workforce development initiatives. The space will include emerging technologies such as virtual and augmented reality devices, data visualization, high-end computers, robotics, and multiple collaboration spaces.

BNSF maintains a major presence as an employer in Springfield and has a long history in the area via a merger, in 1980, with the St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad, known by most as the Frisco. BNSF and other area employers will benefit from students’ enhanced workplace readiness, better ability to work in diverse teams, deeper problem solving, aptitudes with cutting edge technologies, and stronger critical thinking skills.

Special Collection Spotlight: Lena Wills Collection

Special Collection Spotlight: Lena Wills Collection

Old map of Greene CountyThe Lena Wills Collection (M 2) in Special Collections and Archives contains the research material from a local genealogist Lena Wills.  Wills was best known in Springfield for “Ozarks Genealogy,” the column she wrote from 1969 until her death in 1986 for the Springfield News-Leader.  An avid genealogist, she taught classes in the subject at Central Bible College and at other locations.

Wills was born in 1902 and raised in Gerster in St. Clair County.  As a child, her family lived in the back of a store and she got to know the customers, which cultivated her interest in people and families.  When she later became involved in genealogy, she was surprised to discover that some of the “uncles” and “aunts” she had known growing up were actually related to her.  In 1922, she came to Southwest Missouri State Teacher’s College (now Missouri State University).  She did not finish her degree at that time, however, and married Ralph Wills in 1924.

After her children were grown (Jim graduated MSU in 1951 and R. Kenneth was attending) she returned to school in 1953 and graduated with honors in 1957.  In 1969, she wrote her first genealogy column for the News-Leader.  She studied other genealogy columns in preparation for the task, and decided that her column would provide more than just names and dates when possible.

She began building an extensive library of genealogy materials.  She also recorded family trees, indexed several funeral home and other types of records, and even indexed her own collection.

This collection is comprised of books, periodicals, subject files, maps, and card indexes, as well as manuscripts and correspondence related mainly to her genealogy column. The Missouri State University Libraries acquired this collection in November of 1986, following Mrs. Wills’ death.

For more information, see the collection’s finding aid or contact Special Collections and Archives.

Adult Student Service Orientation Workshop

Adult Student Service Orientation Workshop

photo of adult student orientation sessionTracy Stout attended and presented at the Adult Student Welcome hosted by Adult Student Services on Saturday, August 18. This event is a one-day orientation to Missouri State University for new adult students.  Opening remarks were provided by Dr. Joye Norris, Associate Provost for Access and Outreach. The rest of the morning consisted of presentations by various campus organizations including the Bear CLAW, MSU Online, and the MSU Libraries.  Students learned about several campus services available to them including the services, spaces, and collections of the library. This orientation event had over 50 participants, many of whom took advantage of campus tours provided later in the day, including a visit to Duane G. Meyer Library.

Jessica Bennett Attended the Summer Accessibility Institute

Jessica Bennett Attended the Summer Accessibility Institute

Universal Design for Learning graphicThis four day intensive workshop series, conducted by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at MSU, focused on accessibility in teaching design, specifically universal design for learning (UDL).  There are three main principles of universal design: multiple means of representation, multiple means of action and expression, and multiple means of engagement.  All of these principles add up to a course that appeals to learners all over the spectrum of physical, and mental abilities. In an ideal scenario, courses are created using UDL, and this significantly lessens the number of accommodations needed for students of varying abilities.  For example, if a teacher makes sure all documents used in the course are made accessible using Microsoft Word (correct headings/styles), then screen reader software is able to read the document easily, and in a way that makes sense to the learner. This is a very simple thing to adjust, and having so done prior to a course beginning makes it that much easier for everyone.  One of the things that stood out, that the library can do, falls into the multiple means of representation section. Creating library signs that are free of jargon and promote understanding across languages may seem like a small thing, but can positively impact a learners’ experience in the library building. Another point of discussion that popped up during the workshop centered  around textbooks, and learning materials. As we look into various options and uses with OER (Open Educational Resources), we need to seriously question the accessibility of the materials- are they screen readable? Do they allow annotations? If it is a PDF, has it been saved correctly for OCR (Optical Character Recognition)? The library is well-positioned to advocate for these things, which ultimately benefit all learners.