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Month: April 2017

Fit Desk Pulls Up Stakes

Fit Desk Pulls Up Stakes

One of the two fit desks available on the Third Level of Duane G. Meyer Library recently became so buff that it pulled up stakes and moved down one level, in anticipation of the renovation of the southwest area of thePhoto of a Fit Desk in the MSU Meyer Library Second Level this summer. The fit desks have proven to be quite popular with library users and employees, but the Space Committee (Jessica Bennett, Tracy Stout, Nathan Neuschwander, and Tom Peters) noticed that, when the two fit desks were side-by-side and one was in use, the other one rarely was.  So, the Space Committee, charged with optimizing the use, usability, usefulness, and comfort of the public spaces in the building that are managed by the MSU Libraries, decided to move one of the fit desks. If both fit desks — now separated — prove useful, we’ll investigate getting more.

Grant to Study the Trucking Industry along Route 66 in Missouri

Grant to Study the Trucking Industry along Route 66 in Missouri

On April 3rd the MSU Libraries applied for a $5,105 grant from the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program of the National Park Service. We proposed to conduct, in collaboration with Ozarks Alive, at least 20 oral history interviews with individuals involved in and/or knowledgeable of the history of the trucking industry along the Route 66 Corridor in Missouri from 1926 to 1985. For example, Campbell 66 Photo of a Campbell 66 Express truckExpress, a trucking firm based in Springfield, Missouri, was founded in 1926, the same year as Route 66, and filed for bankruptcy in 1986, one year after Route 66 was officially removed from the U.S. Highway System. The impact of commercial trucking along the Route 66 Corridor in Missouri was significant, but has not received much attention to date, compared to recreational travel by family and friends. If funded, the oral history work, matched with in-kind contributions from the MSU Libraries, will be done between October 2017 and August 2018.

Dates for On-Campus Interviews for the AD of Libraries Position

Dates for On-Campus Interviews for the AD of Libraries Position

Image of job search keywordsYesterday we learned that the dates for the on-campus visits of the two finalists for the Associate Dean of Library Services have been set. The primary visit dates for the two will be Tuesday, May 16th and Tuesday, May 23rd. Each finalist will fly into Springfield on the respective Monday before, and fly back out on Wednesday morning. In next week’s Library Notes we’ll provide the names of the two finalists, links to their resumes, and the schedules for their visits. At this point, we are planning Monday evening dinner meetings involving the finalists and those members of the search committee who are available. Available unit heads will have an off-campus lunch with each finalist on Tuesday. If this search is successful, we plan to have our new Associate Dean start in early August.

Key Performance Indicators for the MSU Libraries

Key Performance Indicators for the MSU Libraries

In 2015, the library developed 12 key performance indicators (KPIs). These KPIs include data (numbers) collected each month through Google Forms that various people submit. Can you tell someone how many people walked in the building last year? Do you want to quickly see if our website usage has gone up or down recently? Just take a look at the KPIs to find out. There are a variety of levels at which you can examine the numbers. For quick references, look at the KPI’s spreadsheets for the year you want. If you want more analysis on individual KPIs, explore the various sheets (worksheets or tabs) in each KPI’s spreadsheet. Look at the “Summary” and “LongTrends” sheets for the most useful view for quick comprehension of trends or get the raw data from the “Form Responses 1” and “Calculations” sheets. If you regularly submit data and lost your link to the online submission form, go to the KPI definitions page and look for the appropriate link.
 
KPIs by Year
·         2015-16
·         2016-17
 
KPIs by KPI Number and Name
·         KPI 1 – Gate Counts
·         KPI 2 – Online Catalog Usage
·         KPI 3 – Circulation
·         KPI 4 – E-resource Usage
·         KPI 5 – Reference Questions
·         KPI 6 – Research Consultations
·         KPI 7 – Subject Guide Usage
·         KPI 8 – Information Literacy
·         KPI 9 – Website Usage
·         KPI 10 – YouTube Channel Views
·         KPI 11 – Wireless Access Point Usage (information not available to us)
·         KPI 12 – Research and Publications
E-Resource Spotlight: Encyclopedia of Global Warming and Climate Change

E-Resource Spotlight: Encyclopedia of Global Warming and Climate Change

Image of the Global Warming logoThe Encyclopedia of Global Warming and Climate Change provides a multi-authored, academic yet non-technical resource for students and teachers to understand the importance of global warming, to appreciate the effects of human activity and greenhouse gases around the world, and to learn the history of climate change and the research examining it. The site includes a Reader’s Guide, with broad subjects like ‘Atmospheric Sciences’ and ‘Climate Models’ that provide links to more specific subjects, an A to Z list of encyclopedia entries, and a Subject Index. There are also links to countries and U.S. states that describe how climate change is specifically affecting them.

Google Cardboard Virtual Reality Viewers Are Here

Google Cardboard Virtual Reality Viewers Are Here

Google Cardboard Virtual Reality Viewer
Google Cardboard VR viewer

The Meyer Library has recently acquired two sets of Google Cardboards as an alternative offering to our virtual reality services at Music and Media.  The Google Cardboard is simply a VR viewer that works with a smartphone.  If your smartphone is relatively new (Android 4.1 or iOS 8.0), you can view 360 degree videos and photos, interactive maps, explore VR apps installed in your phone.  Google has also made the Cardboard specifications open to all, so you can make one of these VR viewers yourself if you have the time, patience, and right resources.  To check out a Google Cardboard, visit the Music and Media desk on the Second Level.  If you don’t have a smartphone, you can still experience VR using our VIVE VR headset.  Learn more about virtual reality on our VR libguide.  Make a reservation to use our VR headset, take a break from your desk, and enjoy whale watching under the ocean for a few minutes this week!

MSU Testing Center Increases Its Capacity

MSU Testing Center Increases Its Capacity

Photo of test-taking stations in the MSU Testing Center
Additional Test-Taking Stations in the MSU Testing Center

Earlier in April the MSU Testing Center, a unit of the MSU Libraries, added ten more test-taking cubicles, bringing the total available seats to 65, including the 3 DRC (Disability Resource Center) accommodation rooms.  At present, the new cubicles are being used as additional paper-based exam stations, until additional network access and computers are installed. Once network access and computers have been set up, the Testing Center will be able to accommodate an additional 5 Pearson Vue stations, bringing that total to 15. The Testing Center and RIS (Research and Instructional Services) are collaborating to make optimal use of Room 10B, which is the large instructional room adjacent to the MSU Testing Center, especially in light of the addition of MSU Online Course Test Proctoring services to the service suite of the MSU Testing Center.

Six 2017 Summer Innovation Grants Announced

Six 2017 Summer Innovation Grants Announced

Photo of a woman wearing the HoloLens Headgear
The Microsoft HoloLens Headgear

A total of $40,000 has been made available this summer for internal, competitive innovation grants. The purpose of the Summer Innovation Grants is to support MSU Libraries faculty and staff members who want to create or improve a service, a body of content, and/or a space (real world, online space, virtual world, mixed reality, augmented reality, etc). All six submitted proposals were funded. Raegan Wiechert will continue her good work enabling users to search by genre terms. Shannon Mawhiney will add equipment to the Digitization Lab to digitize VHS tapes for preservation and access. Jim Coombs will continue digitizing rare maps of the region, ranging in time from the Civil War to the Roaring Twenties. Bill Edgar and the research team working on the “information anthropological” study of MSU faculty will be able to get their interviews transcribed for further analysis. Tammy Stewart will use a portable computer to continue weeding microfiche versions of U.S. government documents. Jan Johnson will lead an effort to expand our cutting edge tech services by adding robots and Microsoft HoloLens headgear. 

MSU Libraries Contributes Content to the DPLA

MSU Libraries Contributes Content to the DPLA

Logo of the Digital Public Library of AmericaMSU Libraries is now contributing records from its Digital Collections to the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) through a partnership with Missouri Hub (MoHub).  The DPLA ties together records from across the country into a unified portal for searching, which are contributed by libraries, archives, and museums alike, many of which are connected by service hubs (like MoHub). DPLA includes various ways of searching records also, including by map or by timeline.  Other contributors to DPLA include HathiTrust, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, Internet Archive, ARTStor, and more.  MoHub participants include the Missouri State Archives, Kansas City Public Library, the State Historical Society of Missouri, St. Louis University, Missouri History Museum, and more, including all participants in Missouri Digital HeritageThe records are updated quarterly, and by the next ingest, MSU’s records should include thumbnails, as well as any new records we’ve added in the meantime.  If you have any questions, please contact Shannon Mawhiney (417-836-8977).
E-Resource Spotlight: Daily Life Through History

E-Resource Spotlight: Daily Life Through History

Image of the Daily Life Through History LogoTravel through time and across the globe with Daily Life through History. This comprehensive collection of primary and secondary sources provides direct insight into the social history of societies ranging from the Australian Aborigines all the way to 21st-century China. This versatile database supports coursework and research in history, literature, cultural studies, and more with its focus on cross-disciplinary historical topics such as work, religion, language, art, food and cooking, clothing, housing, and social customs. In Daily Life through History, students and researchers discover the everyday details about past eras that make historical accounts relevant and meaningful.