The 21st Century [University] Presidency

The 21st Century [University] Presidency

Photo of blue sea, blue sky, and white cloudsLast month, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges released a 20-page report, written by Terrence MacTaggert, about the challenges and opportunities facing university presidents in the 21st century.  Quoting from the webpage that links to the full report: “The 21st-Century Presidency: A Call to Enterprise Leadership is the latest in a series of periodic reports from AGB to examine the nature of the presidency and governance. Written by AGB Senior Fellow Terrence MacTaggart, former chancellor of the Minnesota and Maine systems, the report addresses the question of how the presidency has changed—and might need to continue to change—to meet contemporary demands on higher education.”

During the Board of Governors’ Retreat on August 3rd, MSU President Clif Smart praised the report, and read a few passages to the Board. The Blue Horizons Committee of the MSU Libraries has been discussing the report as well, noting possible ways in which the challenges and opportunities facing university presidents and governing boards in this century could dovetail with visioning, key initiatives, leadership roles, and organizational changes in university libraries. The charge to the Blue Horizons Committee is to “engage in blue sky thinking and scan the development horizons of computing, librarianship, higher education, and other fields of endeavor in order to discuss and explore possible preferred futures for the MSU Libraries.” 

GEP 101/UHC 110 Pizza Party at Meyer Library

GEP 101/UHC 110 Pizza Party at Meyer Library

poster of Harry Potter et aliaThe annual GEP 101/UHC 110 Pizza Party at Meyer Library is designed to get new students into the library for the first time while providing us with an opportunity to establish lasting connections with them.  This also gives students a sense of the services, spaces, and collections we have all in one building.  The event provides a fun, no pressure environment for students to explore the building. This year our annual pizza party will happen on the third Friday of the Fall semester (September 8, 6:00 to 7:30 pm) and our theme this year, back by popular demand and in honor of the 20th anniversary of the books and films, is Harry Potter.  This is a great opportunity to interact with so many students who are excited to be here!  Get the party scheduled on your calendars and I hope you will join us this year! A short video of the 2015 Pizza Party (with a Star Wars theme) will help get you in the mood. Recalling the year Byron Stewart came as Papa Smurf will do the same. 
Dedication of the Pete and Sara Morgan Military Insignia Collection

Dedication of the Pete and Sara Morgan Military Insignia Collection

Photo of the Morgan Collection BannerThe Missouri State University Libraries is pleased to announce that the dedication of the world-class Pete and Sara Morgan Military Insignia Collection will be held on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. on the Third Level of Duane G. Meyer Library on the Springfield Campus. Refreshments will be served. At 3:30 remarks will be made by the Morgans, Tom Peters, Dean of Library Services, and Frank Einhellig, Provost. All are welcome to attend this free event as we thank Pete and Sara Morgan for donating to the MSU Libraries their extensive collection, acquired over several decades, that includes military insignia, patches, medals, pins, and more from around the world and across the generations. Selections from the collection, as well as from the Morgan’s impressive library, will be on exhibit. A free parking permit (for Lot 19 or Yellow) can be downloaded, printed, and displayed on your dash from this location.

Special Collection Spotlight: Union Labor Record

Special Collection Spotlight: Union Labor Record

old photo of Claud Hawley and his staffThe Union Labor Record (LA 30) newspaper was founded in 1937 by Claud Hawley as a response to the growing labor movement in Springfield and Southwest Missouri.  Delegates from the Central Labor Union of Springfield felt that the new organizations and new members needed closer organization and education regarding organized labor.  The Union Labor Record was a method of reaching all labor members as well as the general public with labor organization news and the union view of labor-related controversies.  The purpose of the paper was always to further the interests of organized union labor, and it carried the endorsement of the Central Labor Union of Springfield as its official paper.

In 1979 the name of the paper changed to the Springfield Labor Record, which remained in production until 1985.  The last copy available in this collection is from March 21, 1985.

The collection of Union Labor Record issues in Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives contains both bound volumes and unbound issues, with only a few issues missing.  See the finding aid for a complete list.

E-Resource Spotlight: World News Digest

E-Resource Spotlight: World News Digest

Logo of World News DigestFor more than 75 years, World News Digest has been a go-to resource for context and background on key issues and events in the news. This archival record of domestic and international news is updated weekly and contains more than 1 million internal hyperlinks and convenient new features such as tabbed search results. It covers all major political, social, and economic events since November 1940. It also includes World News Digest of current (including Today’s News) and historic events (1940 to present), a searchable “What Happened on That Day” feature from 1940 to present, obituaries (1980 to present), maps, photos, historic documents, country profiles, biographies, heads of state, and more.

One Word: Plastics

One Word: Plastics

Photo of a small boat surrounded by floating plasticsDuane G. Meyer Library will be joining the Office of Public Affairs during Public Affairs Week (Sept. 9-15) to host a display in Room 107 with a focus on the environmental impact of plastics.  The display will feature  the library’s award winning display last seen during RecycleMania last academic year.  “Inside the Garbage of the World,” a documentary film from Journeyman Pictures about the global impact of plastics, will be shown in a continuous loop on the large “Mobile Jumbotron” display in Room 107.

Also during Public Affairs Week, on Thursday, Sept. 14th from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. the MSU Libraries is sponsoring a Living Stories event. Living Stories provide everyone with a chance to encounter books that come alive and talk back!  Our “books” are people with stories to tell and experiences to share, and our readers are free to ask questions and enjoy conversations with their books!  Our books this year include people from different backgrounds who have engaged in the practical issues of sustainability.  As a reader, you will have the opportunity to bust various myths about sustainability, learn how you can make a difference, and interact with your book about your thoughts!

New Sculpture Exhibit in Meyer Library

New Sculpture Exhibit in Meyer Library

Photo of a wooden sculpture by Dwaine CriggerDuring the 2017-2018 academic year, Duane G. Meyer Library will host an exhibit of several large works of art by Dwaine Crigger. The Art and Design Department at Missouri State University is pleased to honor the memory and work of Dwaine Crigger, Professor Emeritus at MSU, and his wife Judy Crigger, long-time residents of the Rountree neighborhood. These instances of Dwaine’s work that remained in his possession at the time of their passing are available for sale to support a scholarship for Art and Design students founded in Dwaine and Judy’s honor by their children.

In a Springfield News-Leader article about the couple, who died unexpectedly from carbon monoxide poisoning in their home, former Mayor Bob Stephens admired both Dwaine’s artistic style and his demeanor. “Stephens said he’d always been amazed by what he called Dwaine’s “whimsical” style of his sculptures, which matched his dry sense of humor.” Nick Nelson, Director of the Springfield Art Museum, noted that Crigger was “generous with his time and expertise.” “He was a real presence in the art community,” Nelson said. Recently he’d helped organize Sculpture Walk Springfield.

Voter Registration Service at Meyer Library

Voter Registration Service at Meyer Library

image of a register to vote graphicFor many years the Duane G. Meyer Library has served as an official voter registration location, providing students, faculty, staff, and community members with a nearby, convenient location to submit their registration forms.  This service is available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.  You will need to bring an ID with you, which can be a driver’s license, student ID, or Social Security card.  The deadline to register to vote prior to any given election is 28 days. To find out the qualifications to register to vote, or to find out if you are registered already, please visit the Greene County Clerk’s website.  For voter registration purposes, students attending colleges or universities here in Springfield are considered citizens of Greene County.  You may wish to check with us to see how this will affect the issues and offices upon which you may vote. Please call 836-4535 if you have questions about this service.

Spotlight on Special Collections: Ozark Land and Lumber Collection

Spotlight on Special Collections: Ozark Land and Lumber Collection

old photo of a lumber trainThe Ozark Land and Lumber Collection (M 4) in Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives provides information about the timber industry in Missouri through the records of John H. Hahn.  Hahn began his career with the Hershey Land and Lumber Company in Muscatine, Iowa; but in 1895, Hershey consolidated with the Ozark Lumber Company and formed the Ozark Land and Lumber Company with saw mills, lumber yards, railroads, and a company store in Shannon County, Missouri.  Hahn was sent to Missouri and served as manager of the company.  The company ceased yellow pine logging operations in 1912 and reincorporated in 1915 as a real estate corporation with properties in Carter, Oregon, and Shannon counties.  In 1923, Ozark Land and Lumber sold 103,297 acres of cut-over land to T.J. Moss Tie Company for tie timber.  Hahn reorganized the company, serving as its president, and opened a yard in Springfield, Missouri, while retaining the mill and store in Winona.  Hahn’s only child, Golda M. Hahn, continued the business after her father’s death in 1947.

Hahn’s personal role in business with other lumber companies, forestry, and land management provides further insight into Missouri’s timber industry and environmental history.  Correspondence and business records in the collection also concern companies such as Missouri Land and Mining Company, Cordz-Fisher Lumber, Moss Tie and Timber, and the Current River Land and Cattle Company, and agencies such as the Department of Agriculture-Forest Service.

This large collection contains a variety of formats, such as maps, deeds, correspondence, ledgers, photographs, postcards, magazines, and newspapers.  Dates range from the 1840s to the 1960s, with the majority falling between the 1890s and 1940s. See the finding aid for a complete list of material.

Second Reptile Day at the Fairbanks

Second Reptile Day at the Fairbanks

photo of students at Reptile Day at the FairbanksThe Second Reptile Day at the Fairbanks was once again a smash hit. Organized with the dedicated assistance of Amy Hankins, the Reference/Maps Associate for the MSU Libraries, and held last Saturday at the Fairbanks School as part of the Northwest Project, the event was attended by 313 people, and was staffed by 17 reptile enthusiasts. The Northwest Project is a partnership led by the Drew Lewis Foundation, Missouri State University, and Drury University, with generous support from the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, the Stanley & Elaine Ball Foundation, and the Musgrave Foundation. The goal of the Northwest Project is to develop and test strategies to help families overcome the challenges of poverty, and to sustain their long-term success in emerging from those circumstances.

Over thirty types of animals were in attendance as well, including a 9.5 foot, forty pound Burmese Python, several Ball Pythons, Pixie Frogs, “Tie-Dyed” Iguanas, Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches and several native Missouri snakes. Many people made it a point to stop by and make comments. One lady who was there with her grand kids was thrilled that there was something like this to expose them to, and wished there had been something like this when she was a kid. Many people overcame their fear of snakes as well, and walked away having learned quite a lot of information about these animals. Everyone enjoyed the event, and several attendees asked if there would be more events like this. It was a great day!