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Author: Tom Peters

Trucking Down the Mother Road Talk in Lebanon on January 29th

Trucking Down the Mother Road Talk in Lebanon on January 29th

Photo of the Library and Route 66 Museum in Lebanon, Missouri“Trucking Down the Mother Road” will be the program topic when the Lebanon-Laclede County Route 66 Society holds its annual membership meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 29, at the Lebanon-Laclede County Library. Non-members are welcome to attend this free meeting and public lecture.

Tom Peters and Kaitlyn McConnell will discuss their project to produce 20 or more oral histories about trucking on Route 66. Peters is Dean of Library Services at Missouri State University, and McConnell is founder of Ozarks Alive, a private initiative to research and write articles about various aspects of Ozarks life and culture.

The project is a collaborative initiative between the Missouri State University Libraries and OzarksAlive.com.

This project is made possible in part by a grant from the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program of the National Park Service.

 

Special Collections Spotlight: The Max Hunter Folk Song Collection

Special Collections Spotlight: The Max Hunter Folk Song Collection

Photo of Max HunterThe Max Hunter Collection is an archive of almost 1600 Ozark Mountain folk songs, recorded between 1956 and 1976. A traveling salesman from Springfield, Missouri, Hunter took his reel-to-reel tape recorder into the hills and hollows of the Ozarks, preserving the heritage of the region by recording the songs and stories of many generations. As important as the songs themselves are the voices of the Missouri and Arkansas folks who shared their talents and recollections with Hunter. Between 1998 and 2001, the materials on this website were digitized and transcribed from Max Hunter’s original reel-to-reel tapes and typewritten lyrics. The project was led by Dr. Michael F. Murray, with assistance from Kathy Murray (tune transcriptions) and Mark Bilyeu (lyric transcriptions) from the Missouri State University Department of Music. The originals are held by the Springfield-Greene County Library District. This is a very important, collaborative collection about an essential aspect of Ozarks history and culture.

Big Read Event in Meyer Library on April 3, 2018

Big Read Event in Meyer Library on April 3, 2018

Cover of the novel Station ElevenDate: Tuesday, April 3, 2018, at 7:00 pm in Meyer Library Room 101

Title: “Mandel Meets the Bard: King Lear and the Shakespearean Apocalypse”

Description: Emily St. John Mandel’s science fiction novel, Station Eleven, a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award, “begins” where King Lear “ends.” While a knowledge of Shakespeare can enrich our reading of Mandel’s novel, we might reverse their roles and ask, “How can Mandel help us read Lear?” By a continuous process of reinvention, Shakespeare remains relevant to contemporary culture: such is the thesis of this lecture.

Presenter: James S. Baumlin is Distinguished Professor of English at Missouri State University, where he teaches renaissance literature and the history of rhetoric. His recent book is Theologies of Language in English Renaissance Literature: Reading Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton (Lanham MD: Lexington, 2012).

The MSU Libraries, facilitated by Bill Edgar, is collaborating with the Springfield-Greene County Library District on this year’s cluster of Big Read: One Book One Community events. The Big Read is a project of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest; with additional support from Friends of the Library.

Search for a New Executive Assistant II in Library Administration

Search for a New Executive Assistant II in Library Administration

Crigger SculptureAs previously reported in Library Notes, our own Joyce Stefka will be retiring at the end of January 2018. The search to find and hire a new Executive Assistant II should commence officially this Friday, when the position is posted on the website that lists current employment opportunities at MSU. Please feel free to share the position announcement with anyone you think may be interested in it, or know someone who is. The position description basically is the official position description for any Executive Assistant II position on campus, modified to specifically include event planning and social media efforts, which are key to our needs here in the MSU Libraries for the person in this position.

A search committee has been formed, consisting of Rachel Besara, Chansouk Ragsdale, and Tom Peters (Chair). Initial review of applicants will begin on Monday, February 5th, with a goal to fill the position so that the new person starts work on March 1st.

E-Resource Spotlight: Dictionary of National Biography

E-Resource Spotlight: Dictionary of National Biography

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is the national record of men and women who have shaped British history and culture, worldwide, from the Romans to the 21st century. The Dictionary offers concise, up-to-date biographies of more than 60,000 men and women who died in or before the year 2012 who have had some significant connection to British history, including individuals from Great Britain as well as individuals such as Mahatma Gandhi, from current or former British territories, or people such as poet T.S. Eliot, a native of St. Louis, Missouri, who migrated to Great Britain. There are also 536 ‘theme’ articles for reference and research and over 11,00 portraits. The Oxford DNB online is updated regularly throughout the year, extending coverage into the 21st century, while also adding new biographies across all historical periods.

Dean Peters Interviewed on C-SPAN 2 (Book TV)

Dean Peters Interviewed on C-SPAN 2 (Book TV)

Still photo from the C-SPAN 2 interview with Tom PetersDuring the weekend of January 6-7, 2018, C-SPAN 2, known as Book TV, aired a number of stories about the history and significance of Springfield, Missouri, including an 8:42 interview with MSU Dean Library Services Thomas A. Peters, about his recent biography of John T. Woodruff, one of the leading developers and civic leaders in the history of Springfield.

Other segments included interviews with:

  • Author Samantha Mosier, Creating Organic Standards in the United States: The Diffusion of State Organic Food and Agriculture Legislation – Missouri State University
  • Author Bill Piston, Wilson’s Creek: The Second Battle of the Civil War and the Men Who Fought It. Piston is an emeritus professor from MSU
  • Neal Lopinot, director for the Center for Archaeological Research at Missouri State University, shared the story of the Deleware tribe that once inhabited an area south of Springfield.
  • In 1865, Wild Bill Hickok shot gambler Davis Tutt in Springfield, Missouri’s town square. It is thought to be the first one-on-one quick draw gun battle of the American West. Jami Lewis, Missouri State Historical Society archivist, shared Hickok’s story and why his fame grew after the incident.
Lobby of Duane G. Meyer Library Gets Renovated

Lobby of Duane G. Meyer Library Gets Renovated

Photo of the barren lobby of Duane G. Meyer LibraryDuring this preparatory week prior to the start of the Spring Semester of 2018 at MSU, crews were busy in the lobby of Duane G. Meyer Library assembling new furniture. Here’s a “before” photo taken early Monday morning, when the space was bare, with a shiny newly waxed floor, followed by another photo taken late Wednesday afternoon, after most of the new furniture had been assembled and installed. The window wall on the south side of the lobby also has been retrofitted with plentiful array of outlets, both the traditional type and USB.

Maps and GIS: Battlefield Atlas of Price’s Missouri Expedition of 1864

Maps and GIS: Battlefield Atlas of Price’s Missouri Expedition of 1864

Battlefield Atlas of Price’s Missouri Expedition of 1864 is intended to serve as an educational reference for the Westport and Mine Creek staff rides. The Atlas is divided into seven parts. Part I, Missouri’s Divided Loyalties, and Part II, Missouri’s Five Seasons, provide an overview of Missouri’s history from the initial settlement of the Louisiana Purchase Territories through the opening years of the American Civil War. The remaining parts cover the Confederate plan, the Confederate movement into Missouri and the Union reaction, the Confederate retreat and Union pursuit into Kansas, and the final Confederate escape back into Arkansas. The atlas has a standard format with the map on the left and the narrative on the right. Each narrative closes with two or more primary source vignettes. These vignettes provide an overview of the events shown on the map and discussed in the narrative from the perspective of persons who participated in the events. In most cases there are two vignettes with the first from a person loyal to the Union and the second from a person who supported the Southern cause. A few narratives have two or more vignettes from only the Union side. This was done to emphasize disagreements and struggles among senior leaders to establish a common course of action. Map 25, Decision at the Little Blue River, is a good example and the three vignettes emphasize the disagreement between Maj. Gen. Samuel Curtis and his subordinate, Maj. Gen. James Blunt on where to locate the Union defensive line.

Woodruff Birthday Dinner Receives Local and National Coverage

Woodruff Birthday Dinner Receives Local and National Coverage

On Saturday evening, January 6, 2018, a dinner was held in the Crystal Room of the old Kentwood Arms Hotel, now MSU’s Kentwood Hall, to celebrate the 150th birthday of John T. Woodruff. Woodruff who lived from 1868 until 1949, and was active in Springfield from 1904 until approximately 1945, was the paragon of civic engagement, building a number of large, important buildings, including the Woodruff Building, the Colonial Hotel, Hotel Sansone, the Kentwood Arms, and the Frisco Office Building. He also brought many institutions and jobs to Springfield, including the Frisco West Maintenance and Repair Shops and O’Reilly Army Hospital.

Ron Warnick’s Route 66 News Blog ran a story about the dinner, and KOLR10, a local Springfield TV station, aired a segment about the event, too.

 

MSU Libraries Receives Grant to Support African American Read-In

MSU Libraries Receives Grant to Support African American Read-In

The Springfield African American Read-In (AARI), a collaborative effort of the Missouri State University Libraries, the Springfield-Greene County Library District, Springfield Public Schools, Drury University, and the Springfield Branch of the NAACP, is entering its ninth year. Under the leadership of Grace Jackson-Brown, a library science faculty member here, the MSU Libraries, acting as the lead institution and fiscal agent for the group, recently received a $1,450 grant from the Community Foundation of the Ozarks to create an AARI website, a brochure, and other materials to promote AARI efforts in Springfield. The grant will help the local AARI initiative to build toward a strong and successful 10th Anniversary year in 2019. The Springfield AARI has an event scheduled next month on Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018 beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the Springfield Art Museum.

The National Council of Teachers of English supports the National AARI. Quoting from the NCTE Council Chronicle of November 2014, “The African American Read-In (AARI) . . . is built on an ambitious yet confident premise: that a school and community reading event can be an effective way to promote diversity in children’s literature, encourage young people to read, and shine a spotlight on African American authors.”