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Author: Tom Peters

Schoolcraft Bicentennial Plans Are Taking Shape

Schoolcraft Bicentennial Plans Are Taking Shape

Old image of Henry Rowe SchoolcraftThe fall of 2018 will mark the bicentennial of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft’s exploration of the Ozarks region, which began in Potosi (now in the state of Missouri) on Thursday, November 18, 1818, and culminated January 1-5, 1819 at the site of a lead mine near the mouth of Pierson Creek, where it flows into the James River, just southeast of present-day Springfield. This is the reason why Highway 65 on the east side of the Springfield metro area is called Schoolcraft Freeway.

The Missouri State University Libraries is helping to organize a planning meeting of the various organizations and individuals interested in hosting events, exhibits, and explorations related to the Schoolcraft Bicentennial. The meeting will be held on Monday, October 23rd from 10:00 a.m. to noon in the large meeting room at the Schweitzer Brentwood Branch (2214 S Brentwood Blvd, east of the intersection of Glenstone Ave. and Seminole) of the Springfield-Greene County Library District. All are welcome to attend. Ample parking is available. Refreshments will be served.

Many organizations already have expressed interest in the Schoolcraft Bicentennial, including: Greene County Archives, History Museum on the Square, Missouri Department of Conservation, Missouri State University Libraries, Smallin Civil War Cave, Springfield-Greene County Library District, State Historical Society of Missouri, Trillium Trust, White River Valley Historical Society, and more.

Interlibrary Loan Supports Researchers

Interlibrary Loan Supports Researchers

Photo of Dr. William MeadowsThere is no telling what awaits Interlibrary Loan (ILL) personnel as the patron requests roll in. While the Missouri State University Libraries tries to make resources as readily available as they can, there are still many physical and digital items that the library cannot immediately provide. Those requests often require the intervention of Interlibrary loan to fulfill patron information needs. Dr. William Meadows, an MSU professor from the Sociology-Anthropology Department, is a frequent recipient of ILL services.

One area of my research is Native American Code Talkers in WW I and WW II. A large percentage of sources in two books and several articles have come through ILL because many of my sources involve old, out of print, and often obscure sources from a variety of fields (anthropology, history, military history, Armed Forces publications, newspapers, magazines, etc.). In addition, they have provided me with many books from varied libraries across the Nation.

Frequently, I have been pleasantly surprised at some of the difficult to find items that they have been able to get other institutions to loan me copies of. Deborah Williams, who retired a while back, and Shannon Conlon have both been extremely helpful and a pleasure to work with. I am very thankful to them for their skills and have included them in a recent acknowledgement section of a book manuscript I currently have under review at the University of New Mexico Press many of the sources used in this work came through them at ILL. Shannon continues to help me in acquiring my endless requests of obscure, hard to find sources, and often gets them faster than I expect.

Requests, such as those from Dr. Meadows, may be quick and easy to find and request, but they also can be incredibly challenging to find and even more difficult to obtain. Shannon Conlon, who oversees ILL at the Duane G. Meyer Library, says “Obtaining rare or hard to find items, like the sources Dr. Meadows needed for his book, is especially rewarding.” It can be difficult to find accurate citations about magazines and newspapers. On top of that, only one or two libraries may have such sources. Conlon often has to browse individual library catalogs and call libraries directly to see if citations are correct and to see if a library is willing to copy an article and send it digitally.

Every day is a new day of requests from Missouri State University patrons. Interlibrary Loan personnel know they have accomplished their goal when they empower patrons to accomplish their research purposes.

E-Resource Spotlight: Points of View Reference Center

E-Resource Spotlight: Points of View Reference Center

Logo of the Points of View Reference CenterContaining resources that present multiple sides of an issue, this database provides rich content that can help students assess and develop persuasive arguments and essays, better understand controversial issues, and develop analytical thinking skills. Points of View Reference Center contains 400 topics (with more than 1,900 essays), each with an overview (objective background / description), point (argument) and counterpoint (opposing argument). Each topic features a Guide to Critical Analysis which helps the reader evaluate the controversy and enhances students’ ability to read critically, develop their own perspective on the issues, and write or debate an effective argument on the topic. Examples of subjects include citizen’s rights, the environment, global issues, health and medicine, and society/culture. Some of the newer hot topics include participation trophies, driverless vehicles, and the Black Lives Matter movement.  Points of View Reference Center provides a balance of materials from all viewpoints with main essays, leading political magazines from all areas of the political spectrum, newspapers, radio and television news transcripts, primary source documents, and reference books. The database also offers related images and supplementary research guides for writing position papers, developing arguments, and debating.

MO 4-YR Public Higher Education Library Deans/Directors to Meet

MO 4-YR Public Higher Education Library Deans/Directors to Meet

Photo of Kirkpatrick Library at the U of Central MOOn Friday, October 27, 2017 in James C. Kirkpatrick Library on the campus of the University of Central Missouri (UCM) in Warrensburg, there will be a meeting of Missouri 4-Year Public Higher Education Library Deans and Directors. While Presidents, Chief Academic Officers, and other key university officials of Missouri’s thirteen 4-Year Universities meet regularly, this is the first such meeting of Library Deans/Directors in recent memory. Gail Staines, Dean of University Library Services at UCM, is organizing this fall get-together, which we hope will become a regular, semiannual gathering to share ideas, needs, and best practices, as well as to discuss and explore issues, opportunities, and potential worthwhile collaborations.

Chris Bono: Student Employee of the Month for October

Chris Bono: Student Employee of the Month for October

Photo of Chris BonoMeet MSU Libraries’ Student Employee of the Month, Chris Bono!

Works in: Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives

Major: History

Favorite Book: There Will Come Soft Rains by Ray Bradbury

Something students should know about the libraries: “The Bear C.L.A.W. will be your best friend when writing anything for class. Use them as much as possible!”

Marilyn McCroskey co-authors article in Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

Marilyn McCroskey co-authors article in Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

Photo of Marilyn McCroskeyMarilyn McCroskey, Head of the Cataloging Unit at the MSU Libraries, is one of six co-authors of an article that recently was published in Cataloging & Classification Quarterly. Marilyn explains, “This was part of my work with the Library of Congress CIP [Cataloging-in-Publication] Advisory Group’s CIP Data Block Committee. I have represented AASL on the CIP Advisory Group since 2000. Cataloging-in-Publication (found on title page verso) had remained a “catalog card” format since 1971. Since libraries don’t use catalog cards any more,  LC thought the CIP format and content should be reconsidered. We surveyed catalogers in different types of libraries to get their input on what changes they would like to see. Schools and small public libraries use the CIP block when cataloging, while larger libraries are members of a bibliographic utility such as OCLC and don’t need it so much. The CIP changes were made with school and public libraries in mind. A second survey after the changes to CIP showed that those changes were very beneficial to the principal users. This article describes the process the committee followed to change the CIP block from a catalog card to a labeled format. My role was background research for the literature survey section, and extensive editing, rather than writing.”

E-Resource Spotlight: SIRS Researcher

E-Resource Spotlight: SIRS Researcher

SIRS e-resource bannerSIRS Researcher is a highly-acclaimed general reference database containing thousands of full-text articles exploring social, scientific, health, historic, business, economic, political and global issues. Articles and graphics are carefully selected from 2,000 domestic and international publications according to strict criteria with regard to content and age appropriateness. Thousands of hand-selected, authoritative newspaper and magazine articles, graphics, charts, maps, primary sources, government documents, websites, multimedia, as well as critical thinking questions, and timelines help broaden student comprehension of each topic. Users can easily retrieve information by Subject Heading, Topic Browse and Keyword searches. Items can be printed, saved, e-mailed, and now sent to Google Drive. Analysis and opinions cover the pros, cons, and everything in between of over 345 current issues. Editorially created content with engaging Essential Questions with answers, and viewpoint articles help build solid foundations for understanding complex global issues.

MSU Libraries and SGCLD Team Up to Fight Fake News

MSU Libraries and SGCLD Team Up to Fight Fake News

Photo of Tracy Stout
Tracy Stout
Photo of Jessica Bennett
Jessica Bennett

The MSU Libraries and the Springfield-Greene County Library District are collaborating to help citizens fight fake news. A hands-on class to help people to hone their skills to evaluate news stories and to protect themselves against fake news will be offered twice by Tracy Stout and Jessica Bennett, library science faculty members at MSU. Tracy is Head of the Research and Instructional Services (RIS) Unit, and Jessica is a reference and e-learning library faculty member in RIS. They will provide a step-by-step process for assessing the credibility of information, with many tips and practical advice.

The class will be offered twice in the coming weeks:

  1. Thursday, October 12 at 7:00 p.m. in the Harrison Room of The Library Center on South Campbell Avenue. To register, call 417-883-5341.
  2. Wednesday, November 1 at 7:00 p.m. in the Auditorium in The Library Center. Registration opens on October 23rd. To register, call 417-883-5341.
Native Art of the Americas Exhibit Open

Native Art of the Americas Exhibit Open

Please join us on Wednesday, October 18, from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. in Special Collections and Archives (Meyer Library 306) as students, faculty, and supporters responsible for the “Native Art of the Americas” exhibit gather for an opening reception.

Featuring art and artifacts from throughout the Americas, this exhibit reflects the research and interpretation of Dr. Billie Follensbee’s advanced art history students from the 2016-2017 courses ART 385: Art of the Americas and ART 485: Art of Mesoamerica. In these integrated Citizenship and Service-Learning classes, the students worked with objects on loan from the Ralph Foster Museum, the History Museum on the Square, the Zinn collection, the Ballweg collection, and the Hernandez collection, as well as other private collections.

This event is free and open to the public.

Special Collections and Archives in Meyer Library is pleased to support Dr. Follensbee and her students by providing study space and conservation facilities, as well as developing the current exhibit showcasing the students’ work.

For more information or to receive a visitor parking permit for that day, contact Special Collections at Archives@missouristate.edu or 417.836.5428.

The exhibit continues through January 19, 2018.

Jami Lewis is the New Archivist for the SHSMO Springfield Research Center

Jami Lewis is the New Archivist for the SHSMO Springfield Research Center

Photo of Jami LewisPlease join us in welcoming Jami Lewis to Meyer Library.  Jami is the new archivist with the State Historical Society of Missouri Research Center in Springfield.  She joins Erin Smither in preserving and providing access to the archival collections of the Society.  Prior to accepting this position, Jami was the archivist for the History Museum on the Square.  She also serves as a Community Scholar through the Missouri Folk Art Program, is active with the Lawrence County Historical Society, and has been an independent contractor on projects ranging from grant writing to genealogical research. To learn more about Missouri State University’s cooperative arrangement with the State Historical Society of Missouri, visit http://libraries.missouristate.edu/SHSMO.htm.  Jami’s contact information is lewisjami@shsmo.org or 417.836.3782.  The SHSMO office is located in Special Collections and Archives (Room 306).