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Author: Tom Peters

Kimberly Brubaker Bradley to Speak

Kimberly Brubaker Bradley to Speak

Photo of author Kimberly Brubaker BradleyOn Wednesday, March 7, 2018 noted children’s and young adult author Kimberly Brubaker Bradley will speak in Carrington Auditorium from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Her 2016 book, The War That Saved My Life, her seventeenth published book, was a Newbery Honor Book. The novel is set in 1939 in London and the surrounding countryside, as children are sent out into the country to avoid German bombs. Amazon notes, “This #1 New York Times bestseller is an exceptionally moving story of triumph against all odds set during World War II. For fans of Counting by 7s and Sarah, Plain and Tall.”

This event is free of charge and open to the public.

Sheila Ponder Plans to Retire

Sheila Ponder Plans to Retire

Photo of Sheila PonderThis week Sheila Ponder, a Library Associate I in our Cataloging Unit, announced her plans to retire at the end of April. Sheila has served the University Libraries and its many users for over 44 years! In May of 1973 she earned her B.S. in Business from SMSU, and in September she began working in the library as a Stacks Maintenance Clerk. In the summer of 1987 Sheila transferred from Circulation to Cataloging to replace Cindy Ford. Congratulations, Sheila, on your long and successful career. She plans to enjoy her retirement in part by watching and helping her twin granddaughters, Gracie and Georgia, make their way through their Terrible Two’s!

E-Resource Spotlight: Gender Studies Database

E-Resource Spotlight: Gender Studies Database

Logo of the Gender Studies DatabaseGender Studies Database provides indexing and abstracts covering the full spectrum of gender-related scholarship. It offers over a million records from scholarly and popular publications, including journals, books, conference papers and theses. The time period covered includes 1930 to the present. Subjects include gender inequality, masculinity, post-feminism and gender identity.

Student Employee Featured in KOLR10 TV Report

Student Employee Featured in KOLR10 TV Report

Cover of the Rose Bridge CD by Abbey WaterworthMSU student Abbey Waterworth, a Christian County native who sings, plays music, and records albums, and who also works on the Gordon McCann project in the Digitization Lab of the MSU Libraries, was featured in a story that appeared on local television station KOLR10 last weekend.

The story was produced by Tim Leimkuhler, and most of the footage was shot in the Digitization Lab, but the story, rightly so, focuses on Abbey’s musical talents. Abbey says she has to more musical projects in the works that will appear in the upcoming documentary called “Songs of Unsung America.” Abbey’s performance schedule can be found on Facebook at Abbey Waterworth Music which includes a show at Galloway Station next Saturday, Feb. 3 at 8 p.m.Congratulations, Abbey!

Special Collections Spotlight: Birdle Mannon Collection (M0008)

Special Collections Spotlight: Birdle Mannon Collection (M0008)

Birdle Hilda Rosalie Mannon was born on April 15, 1909.  In 1916, at the age of seven, Birdle moved from North Platte, Nebraska, to the Ozark Mountains near Brownbranch, Taney County, Missouri, along with her mother, father, two brothers, and a sister. Birdle was an educated woman who chose a simpler way of living.  She attended school in Brownbranch and graduated from Ava High School.  She spent four summers in the 1940s studying at Southwest Missouri State College (now MSU).

Miss Mannon resided at the family’s homestead her entire life.  The Mannon cabin had no electricity or running water. Following her sister’s death, a phone was installed in the 1970s for Birdle’s safety.  She owned a truck for a few years.  Birdle did not stray far from home; Kansas City was the farthest she ever traveled besides her initial trip from Nebraska.  She was a school teacher, Sunday school teacher, and a newspaper correspondent for local newspapers.  She was a deeply religious woman and attended Caney General Baptist Church in Brownbranch.  Her life became a point of interest in the 1990s when USA Today and the Springfield News-Leader wrote stories about her rugged lifestyle choice.  An excerpt from a short biography of Birdle within the collection expressed what many people wondered of Birdle Mannon:

The curiosity is how an intelligent and apparently [emotionally] stable [person] who has been exposed to the ‘outside’ world, can be so contented living alone in this little hollow so far away from her nearest neighbor.  Just asking the question admits an assumption that ‘happiness’ requires the presence of other people as well as modern conveniences…. We [should] try to learn whatever it is that allows her to be so happy with so little.  After all, so many of our problems are related either to our efforts to obtain more, or to keep from losing what we already have.  She has neither of those worries (1/44).

Birdle passed away October 26, 1999, at the age of 90.  A few years following her passing, the Mannon cabin became the property of Silver Dollar City.  The amusement park uses the cabin along with reproductions of material from this collection as an interpretive exhibit for visitors.  The material within the collection is predominantly a product of Samuel W. (S. W.) Mannon (Birdle’s father), Birdle Mannon, and Elnora Mannon (Birdle’s sister).

E-Resource of the Week: ICE Video Library

E-Resource of the Week: ICE Video Library

Screenshot of the ICE Video LibraryInternational Clinical Educators (ICE) specializes in online streaming video for faculty and students in physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy assistant and occupational therapy assistant programs worldwide… The Library provides excellent tools and visual resources to both faculty and students in physical and occupational therapy curriculum. With unlimited access to streaming videos of real-life patient assessment and intervention, the ICE Video Library can be viewed on campus, at home, on the go and in online courses! All of the videos are professionally filmed with actual patients and therapists in real-life treatment settings including acute care, skilled nursing, outpatient, home health and ICU.

Tammy Stewart Plans to Retire This Summer

Tammy Stewart Plans to Retire This Summer

Photo of Tammy StewartAfter over 28 years of service to the Missouri State University Libraries and its many users, Tammy Stewart has announced her plans to retire this summer. On January 3, 1990 she began as a member of the library staff. On December 7, 1997 she became a tenure-track library faculty member, earning tenure in 2001. Most of her career has been spent with government documents — state, federal, and, most recently, United Nations — and with the many users of documents. In her retirement Tammy plans to amplify her expressions of her lifelong love for cats and dogs, which she cherishes with equal measure. Congratulations, Tammy!

Search for a New Archivist to Begin Soon

Search for a New Archivist to Begin Soon

Detail of the cover of the 1910 OzarkoThe search for a new Archivist for the MSU Libraries, to succeed Anne Baker, who last October became the new Head of Special Collections and Archives, will open soon, probably tomorrow, Friday, January 26, 2018. The goal is to fill the position by May 1, 2018.

Here’s the description of the general function: “The Archivist is involved with all aspects of collection development and collection care for Special Collections and Archives. The Archivist is actively involved with collection development decisions based on knowledge of regional history and culture, awareness of archival standards and trends, and understanding user needs. The Archivist recognizes the expanding role of Special Collections as a repository for a broad range of cultural resources. The Archivist is responsible for processing collections to archival standards, including the creation of modes of intellectual access to collections, such as finding aids. The Archivist is also responsible for initiating and participating in outreach, reference, and collection development activities for Special Collections and Archives. The Archivist leads and coordinates the University Archives.” For more information and to apply, please visit the MSU listing of employment opportunities.

 

Archival Silences Talk on Tuesday February 27th

Archival Silences Talk on Tuesday February 27th

Photo of Dorothy BerryThe MSU African & African-American Studies Committee and the MSU Libraries are collaborating to bring a national speaker to campus next month.

Dorothy Berry, an Archivist at the University of Minnesota who currently is serving as the Digitization and Metadata Lead for the Umbra Search African American History Project, involving dozens of partner organizations, including Missouri State University, will speak in Room 101 of Duane G. Meyer Library beginning at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 on the topic of “Giving Voice to Archival Silences: Amplifying Black History Through Research and Technology.” 

Archival research is the bedrock of historical scholarship, but gaps in collections have often led to gaps in our understanding, especially when it comes to marginalized groups like African Americans. This talk will explore the nature of these archival silences, how they affect our relationship to the past, and how emerging research and technologies can bridge those gaps in libraries, archives, and museums.

Sponsors: MSU’s African and African American Studies Program; College of Humanities
& Public Affairs; Division of Diversity and Inclusion; Meyer Library Special Collections
& Archives; Springfield Research Center, State Historical Society of Missouri.

This talk is free and open to the general public.

 

Donation of Digital Copies of Old RadiOzark Transcriptions

Donation of Digital Copies of Old RadiOzark Transcriptions

Mothers March on Polio transcription labelIn January 2018, thanks to the perspicacity and generosity of Wayne Glenn, The Old Record Collector, whose weekly radio program appears on KTXR, and the hard work of Randy Stewart from KSMU Radio (and spouse of our own Tammy Stewart), the MSU Libraries received a donation of digitized copies of several old RadiOzark transcriptions (that is, LP recordings) of radio programs from the Fifties.

The recordings include:

  1. Mothers’ March on Polio from January 31, 1952, featuring performances by local talent such as Bob White, Speedy (Junior) Haworth, Slim Wilson, the Philharmonics, Bill Ring, and Smiley Burnette
  2. Mothers’ March on Polio from January 29, 1953, featuring performances by Doc Martin, the Melodeers, and many more
  3. The Red Foley Radio Show, No. 73, with Bill Ring
  4. The Red Foley Radio Show, No. 74, with Porter Wagoner

They complement our efforts to have old kinescopes of the Ozark Jubilee digitized and made freely available online.