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Month: January 2018

E-Resource of the Week: ICE Video Library

E-Resource of the Week: ICE Video Library

Screenshot of the ICE Video LibraryInternational Clinical Educators (ICE) specializes in online streaming video for faculty and students in physical therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy assistant and occupational therapy assistant programs worldwide… The Library provides excellent tools and visual resources to both faculty and students in physical and occupational therapy curriculum. With unlimited access to streaming videos of real-life patient assessment and intervention, the ICE Video Library can be viewed on campus, at home, on the go and in online courses! All of the videos are professionally filmed with actual patients and therapists in real-life treatment settings including acute care, skilled nursing, outpatient, home health and ICU.

Tammy Stewart Plans to Retire This Summer

Tammy Stewart Plans to Retire This Summer

Photo of Tammy StewartAfter over 28 years of service to the Missouri State University Libraries and its many users, Tammy Stewart has announced her plans to retire this summer. On January 3, 1990 she began as a member of the library staff. On December 7, 1997 she became a tenure-track library faculty member, earning tenure in 2001. Most of her career has been spent with government documents — state, federal, and, most recently, United Nations — and with the many users of documents. In her retirement Tammy plans to amplify her expressions of her lifelong love for cats and dogs, which she cherishes with equal measure. Congratulations, Tammy!

Search for a New Archivist to Begin Soon

Search for a New Archivist to Begin Soon

Detail of the cover of the 1910 OzarkoThe search for a new Archivist for the MSU Libraries, to succeed Anne Baker, who last October became the new Head of Special Collections and Archives, will open soon, probably tomorrow, Friday, January 26, 2018. The goal is to fill the position by May 1, 2018.

Here’s the description of the general function: “The Archivist is involved with all aspects of collection development and collection care for Special Collections and Archives. The Archivist is actively involved with collection development decisions based on knowledge of regional history and culture, awareness of archival standards and trends, and understanding user needs. The Archivist recognizes the expanding role of Special Collections as a repository for a broad range of cultural resources. The Archivist is responsible for processing collections to archival standards, including the creation of modes of intellectual access to collections, such as finding aids. The Archivist is also responsible for initiating and participating in outreach, reference, and collection development activities for Special Collections and Archives. The Archivist leads and coordinates the University Archives.” For more information and to apply, please visit the MSU listing of employment opportunities.

 

Archival Silences Talk on Tuesday February 27th

Archival Silences Talk on Tuesday February 27th

Photo of Dorothy BerryThe MSU African & African-American Studies Committee and the MSU Libraries are collaborating to bring a national speaker to campus next month.

Dorothy Berry, an Archivist at the University of Minnesota who currently is serving as the Digitization and Metadata Lead for the Umbra Search African American History Project, involving dozens of partner organizations, including Missouri State University, will speak in Room 101 of Duane G. Meyer Library beginning at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 on the topic of “Giving Voice to Archival Silences: Amplifying Black History Through Research and Technology.” 

Archival research is the bedrock of historical scholarship, but gaps in collections have often led to gaps in our understanding, especially when it comes to marginalized groups like African Americans. This talk will explore the nature of these archival silences, how they affect our relationship to the past, and how emerging research and technologies can bridge those gaps in libraries, archives, and museums.

Sponsors: MSU’s African and African American Studies Program; College of Humanities
& Public Affairs; Division of Diversity and Inclusion; Meyer Library Special Collections
& Archives; Springfield Research Center, State Historical Society of Missouri.

This talk is free and open to the general public.

 

Donation of Digital Copies of Old RadiOzark Transcriptions

Donation of Digital Copies of Old RadiOzark Transcriptions

Mothers March on Polio transcription labelIn January 2018, thanks to the perspicacity and generosity of Wayne Glenn, The Old Record Collector, whose weekly radio program appears on KTXR, and the hard work of Randy Stewart from KSMU Radio (and spouse of our own Tammy Stewart), the MSU Libraries received a donation of digitized copies of several old RadiOzark transcriptions (that is, LP recordings) of radio programs from the Fifties.

The recordings include:

  1. Mothers’ March on Polio from January 31, 1952, featuring performances by local talent such as Bob White, Speedy (Junior) Haworth, Slim Wilson, the Philharmonics, Bill Ring, and Smiley Burnette
  2. Mothers’ March on Polio from January 29, 1953, featuring performances by Doc Martin, the Melodeers, and many more
  3. The Red Foley Radio Show, No. 73, with Bill Ring
  4. The Red Foley Radio Show, No. 74, with Porter Wagoner

They complement our efforts to have old kinescopes of the Ozark Jubilee digitized and made freely available online.

Trucking Down the Mother Road Talk in Lebanon on January 29th

Trucking Down the Mother Road Talk in Lebanon on January 29th

Photo of the Library and Route 66 Museum in Lebanon, Missouri“Trucking Down the Mother Road” will be the program topic when the Lebanon-Laclede County Route 66 Society holds its annual membership meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 29, at the Lebanon-Laclede County Library. Non-members are welcome to attend this free meeting and public lecture.

Tom Peters and Kaitlyn McConnell will discuss their project to produce 20 or more oral histories about trucking on Route 66. Peters is Dean of Library Services at Missouri State University, and McConnell is founder of Ozarks Alive, a private initiative to research and write articles about various aspects of Ozarks life and culture.

The project is a collaborative initiative between the Missouri State University Libraries and OzarksAlive.com.

This project is made possible in part by a grant from the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program of the National Park Service.

 

Special Collections Spotlight: The Max Hunter Folk Song Collection

Special Collections Spotlight: The Max Hunter Folk Song Collection

Photo of Max HunterThe Max Hunter Collection is an archive of almost 1600 Ozark Mountain folk songs, recorded between 1956 and 1976. A traveling salesman from Springfield, Missouri, Hunter took his reel-to-reel tape recorder into the hills and hollows of the Ozarks, preserving the heritage of the region by recording the songs and stories of many generations. As important as the songs themselves are the voices of the Missouri and Arkansas folks who shared their talents and recollections with Hunter. Between 1998 and 2001, the materials on this website were digitized and transcribed from Max Hunter’s original reel-to-reel tapes and typewritten lyrics. The project was led by Dr. Michael F. Murray, with assistance from Kathy Murray (tune transcriptions) and Mark Bilyeu (lyric transcriptions) from the Missouri State University Department of Music. The originals are held by the Springfield-Greene County Library District. This is a very important, collaborative collection about an essential aspect of Ozarks history and culture.

Big Read Event in Meyer Library on April 3, 2018

Big Read Event in Meyer Library on April 3, 2018

Cover of the novel Station ElevenDate: Tuesday, April 3, 2018, at 7:00 pm in Meyer Library Room 101

Title: “Mandel Meets the Bard: King Lear and the Shakespearean Apocalypse”

Description: Emily St. John Mandel’s science fiction novel, Station Eleven, a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award, “begins” where King Lear “ends.” While a knowledge of Shakespeare can enrich our reading of Mandel’s novel, we might reverse their roles and ask, “How can Mandel help us read Lear?” By a continuous process of reinvention, Shakespeare remains relevant to contemporary culture: such is the thesis of this lecture.

Presenter: James S. Baumlin is Distinguished Professor of English at Missouri State University, where he teaches renaissance literature and the history of rhetoric. His recent book is Theologies of Language in English Renaissance Literature: Reading Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton (Lanham MD: Lexington, 2012).

The MSU Libraries, facilitated by Bill Edgar, is collaborating with the Springfield-Greene County Library District on this year’s cluster of Big Read: One Book One Community events. The Big Read is a project of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest; with additional support from Friends of the Library.

Search for a New Executive Assistant II in Library Administration

Search for a New Executive Assistant II in Library Administration

Crigger SculptureAs previously reported in Library Notes, our own Joyce Stefka will be retiring at the end of January 2018. The search to find and hire a new Executive Assistant II should commence officially this Friday, when the position is posted on the website that lists current employment opportunities at MSU. Please feel free to share the position announcement with anyone you think may be interested in it, or know someone who is. The position description basically is the official position description for any Executive Assistant II position on campus, modified to specifically include event planning and social media efforts, which are key to our needs here in the MSU Libraries for the person in this position.

A search committee has been formed, consisting of Rachel Besara, Chansouk Ragsdale, and Tom Peters (Chair). Initial review of applicants will begin on Monday, February 5th, with a goal to fill the position so that the new person starts work on March 1st.

E-Resource Spotlight: Dictionary of National Biography

E-Resource Spotlight: Dictionary of National Biography

The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is the national record of men and women who have shaped British history and culture, worldwide, from the Romans to the 21st century. The Dictionary offers concise, up-to-date biographies of more than 60,000 men and women who died in or before the year 2012 who have had some significant connection to British history, including individuals from Great Britain as well as individuals such as Mahatma Gandhi, from current or former British territories, or people such as poet T.S. Eliot, a native of St. Louis, Missouri, who migrated to Great Britain. There are also 536 ‘theme’ articles for reference and research and over 11,00 portraits. The Oxford DNB online is updated regularly throughout the year, extending coverage into the 21st century, while also adding new biographies across all historical periods.