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Month: August 2017

One Word: Plastics

One Word: Plastics

Photo of a small boat surrounded by floating plasticsDuane G. Meyer Library will be joining the Office of Public Affairs during Public Affairs Week (Sept. 9-15) to host a display in Room 107 with a focus on the environmental impact of plastics.  The display will feature  the library’s award winning display last seen during RecycleMania last academic year.  “Inside the Garbage of the World,” a documentary film from Journeyman Pictures about the global impact of plastics, will be shown in a continuous loop on the large “Mobile Jumbotron” display in Room 107.

Also during Public Affairs Week, on Thursday, Sept. 14th from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. the MSU Libraries is sponsoring a Living Stories event. Living Stories provide everyone with a chance to encounter books that come alive and talk back!  Our “books” are people with stories to tell and experiences to share, and our readers are free to ask questions and enjoy conversations with their books!  Our books this year include people from different backgrounds who have engaged in the practical issues of sustainability.  As a reader, you will have the opportunity to bust various myths about sustainability, learn how you can make a difference, and interact with your book about your thoughts!

New Sculpture Exhibit in Meyer Library

New Sculpture Exhibit in Meyer Library

Photo of a wooden sculpture by Dwaine CriggerDuring the 2017-2018 academic year, Duane G. Meyer Library will host an exhibit of several large works of art by Dwaine Crigger. The Art and Design Department at Missouri State University is pleased to honor the memory and work of Dwaine Crigger, Professor Emeritus at MSU, and his wife Judy Crigger, long-time residents of the Rountree neighborhood. These instances of Dwaine’s work that remained in his possession at the time of their passing are available for sale to support a scholarship for Art and Design students founded in Dwaine and Judy’s honor by their children.

In a Springfield News-Leader article about the couple, who died unexpectedly from carbon monoxide poisoning in their home, former Mayor Bob Stephens admired both Dwaine’s artistic style and his demeanor. “Stephens said he’d always been amazed by what he called Dwaine’s “whimsical” style of his sculptures, which matched his dry sense of humor.” Nick Nelson, Director of the Springfield Art Museum, noted that Crigger was “generous with his time and expertise.” “He was a real presence in the art community,” Nelson said. Recently he’d helped organize Sculpture Walk Springfield.

Voter Registration Service at Meyer Library

Voter Registration Service at Meyer Library

image of a register to vote graphicFor many years the Duane G. Meyer Library has served as an official voter registration location, providing students, faculty, staff, and community members with a nearby, convenient location to submit their registration forms.  This service is available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.  You will need to bring an ID with you, which can be a driver’s license, student ID, or Social Security card.  The deadline to register to vote prior to any given election is 28 days. To find out the qualifications to register to vote, or to find out if you are registered already, please visit the Greene County Clerk’s website.  For voter registration purposes, students attending colleges or universities here in Springfield are considered citizens of Greene County.  You may wish to check with us to see how this will affect the issues and offices upon which you may vote. Please call 836-4535 if you have questions about this service.

Spotlight on Special Collections: Ozark Land and Lumber Collection

Spotlight on Special Collections: Ozark Land and Lumber Collection

old photo of a lumber trainThe Ozark Land and Lumber Collection (M 4) in Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives provides information about the timber industry in Missouri through the records of John H. Hahn.  Hahn began his career with the Hershey Land and Lumber Company in Muscatine, Iowa; but in 1895, Hershey consolidated with the Ozark Lumber Company and formed the Ozark Land and Lumber Company with saw mills, lumber yards, railroads, and a company store in Shannon County, Missouri.  Hahn was sent to Missouri and served as manager of the company.  The company ceased yellow pine logging operations in 1912 and reincorporated in 1915 as a real estate corporation with properties in Carter, Oregon, and Shannon counties.  In 1923, Ozark Land and Lumber sold 103,297 acres of cut-over land to T.J. Moss Tie Company for tie timber.  Hahn reorganized the company, serving as its president, and opened a yard in Springfield, Missouri, while retaining the mill and store in Winona.  Hahn’s only child, Golda M. Hahn, continued the business after her father’s death in 1947.

Hahn’s personal role in business with other lumber companies, forestry, and land management provides further insight into Missouri’s timber industry and environmental history.  Correspondence and business records in the collection also concern companies such as Missouri Land and Mining Company, Cordz-Fisher Lumber, Moss Tie and Timber, and the Current River Land and Cattle Company, and agencies such as the Department of Agriculture-Forest Service.

This large collection contains a variety of formats, such as maps, deeds, correspondence, ledgers, photographs, postcards, magazines, and newspapers.  Dates range from the 1840s to the 1960s, with the majority falling between the 1890s and 1940s. See the finding aid for a complete list of material.

Second Reptile Day at the Fairbanks

Second Reptile Day at the Fairbanks

photo of students at Reptile Day at the FairbanksThe Second Reptile Day at the Fairbanks was once again a smash hit. Organized with the dedicated assistance of Amy Hankins, the Reference/Maps Associate for the MSU Libraries, and held last Saturday at the Fairbanks School as part of the Northwest Project, the event was attended by 313 people, and was staffed by 17 reptile enthusiasts. The Northwest Project is a partnership led by the Drew Lewis Foundation, Missouri State University, and Drury University, with generous support from the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, the Stanley & Elaine Ball Foundation, and the Musgrave Foundation. The goal of the Northwest Project is to develop and test strategies to help families overcome the challenges of poverty, and to sustain their long-term success in emerging from those circumstances.

Over thirty types of animals were in attendance as well, including a 9.5 foot, forty pound Burmese Python, several Ball Pythons, Pixie Frogs, “Tie-Dyed” Iguanas, Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches and several native Missouri snakes. Many people made it a point to stop by and make comments. One lady who was there with her grand kids was thrilled that there was something like this to expose them to, and wished there had been something like this when she was a kid. Many people overcame their fear of snakes as well, and walked away having learned quite a lot of information about these animals. Everyone enjoyed the event, and several attendees asked if there would be more events like this. It was a great day!

E-Resource Spotlight: STAT!Ref

E-Resource Spotlight: STAT!Ref

Logo of the STAT!Ref eresourceSTAT!Ref is an easy to use digital medical library for healthcare professionals. It is a collection of clinically-oriented health sciences ready reference e-books. The collection provides convenient access to information about prescription drugs, diagnosis information, and treatment options for a variety of medical conditions. The titles can be browsed, searched individually, or multiple titles can be searched at the same time.

Spotlight on Special Collections: Theatre and Dance

Spotlight on Special Collections: Theatre and Dance

Photo of John Goodman at SMS
John Goodman in an SMS Theatrical Production

The large Theatre and Dance Department Collection (RG 4/9) in Special Collections and Archives gives researchers an in-depth look at the history of theatrical performance at Missouri State University, with material such as programs, photographs and slides, scrapbooks and albums, recordings of programs and commercials, reports, flyers, newspaper clippings, and more, dating back to the 1910s.

Plays were performed in the early years at of the university, but not initially as a part of any formal department.  The senior class put on a play each spring, and the Coburn Players, an outside organization, performed here during the summers.  It wasn’t until 1915, however, that the first class in theatre was offered to students, as part of the Department of English and Speech.  Theatre became a part of the new Speech and Theatre Department in 1965, and the Theatre and Dance Department was later established in 1984. Dance, prior to 1980, had been a part of the Health and Physical Education Department.

Productions performed by the Theatre and Dance Department have included a variety of formats, such as musicals, operas, one acts, interpreters/readers theatre, USO tours, Tent Theatre productions, variety shows, and dance performances.  Tent Theatre began in 1963 as an alternative to the Carrington Auditorium, which was not air-conditioned at the time.  Even though air conditioning was added to the theater later, Tent Theatre still continues as a campus tradition.

A small selection of the material in this collection, mostly relating to USO tours in the 1950s-1970s, is also available in our online Digital Collections.

Fore-Edge Painted Book Acquired by the MSU Libraries

Fore-Edge Painted Book Acquired by the MSU Libraries

image of a fore-edge painted bookThe MSU Libraries has acquired a rare book for Special Collections & Archives that is notable because it contains a fore-edge painting. The book is a book of poems by Thomas Gray, an 18th century English poet and scholar, best remembered for his Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard. In this particular type of fore-edge painted book, the landscape painting cannot be seen until the fore-edge of the text block is fanned.

The MSU Libraries at Showcase

The MSU Libraries at Showcase

Next Wednesday the 32nd annual Showcase on Teaching and Learning will be held in the Plaster Student Union on the MSU campus. The MSU Libraries will have several presentations.

  • Photo of Jessica and Tracy in the new RIS CommonsJessica and Tracy to Promote New Library Space:  Jessica Bennett and Tracy Stout will have a table at the upcoming FCTL’s 32nd Showcase on Teaching and Learning. Showcase is an opportunity for faculty to highlight their teaching and learning and reaches approximately 350-400 faculty who attend.  Space is an important part of the teaching and learning process, and the library has been working hard to update our spaces to best meet the needs of our students.  Showcase allows us the opportunity to  feature and promote our new RIS Commons space.  This space was developed in conjunction with Color Art and Steelcase. Our focus was creating a balance of the types of spaces students want to learn in.  Some of these types of spaces include private/alone, public/alone, private/together, and public/together.  We encourage those who have yet to see the new space to come and visit!
  • Jan, Scott, and Tom to Promote Interdisciplinary Space and New Tech Services:  Tom, Scott,  Jan, and others will be working a service unit table during the 32nd Showcase on Teaching and Learning on August 16, 2017 between 9:30 and 11:30.  We will be talking to people about the idea of developing an interdisciplinary space and new technology that is available at the library, such as virtual reality and augmented reality.  We are excited for the opportunity to speak with faculty and administration about the important work being done by everyone at the library.
Missouri Fiddler’s Dream at the MSU Libraries

Missouri Fiddler’s Dream at the MSU Libraries

Cover of the book Fiddler's DreamHoward Wight Marshall, the author of the new book, Fiddler’s Dream: Old-Time, Swing, and Bluegrass Fiddling in Twentieth-Century Missouri, will give a presentation — including musical performances — on Friday evening, November 10, 2017, beginning at 7:00 p.m. in Room 101 of Duane G. Meyer Library. In this sequel to his 2013 book on earlier old-time fiddlers in Missouri, Play Me Something Quick and Devilish, Prof. Howard uses oral history, archival photographs, and transcriptions of selected tunes to trace the evolution of traditional fiddle music in Missouri from the early 1920s through the abrupt changes in American society and traditional music in the 1960s. The book focuses on fiddle music in everyday life at music parties, dances, pie suppers, festivals, contests, and oprys. Local greats, such as Lenny Aleshire, Buster Fellows, and Zed Tennis are among the many Missouri fiddlers covered in this book. This presentation is free and open to the public.