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Month: July 2017

Good Read: What About the Bookstore?

Good Read: What About the Bookstore?

Photo of Steven BellSteven Bell, the associate university librarian at Temple University, recently published an article in College & Research Libraries News about how many universities are implementing Textbook Affordability Projects (TAP), often tied to the general Open Educational Resources (OER) movement. While librarians often are assuming leadership roles in TAP initiatives, the question often is raised, “What about the campus bookstore?” Bell suggests that librarians need to develop a more current and dynamic sense of the relationships (real and desired) between the library and the bookstore. Bell designed and administered a survey that inquires about the prevalence of TAPs, as well as the current state of library-bookstore relationships. “This article shares information from the survey and its findings so that academic librarians seeking to implement a TAP may do so with a more realistic perspective of what to expect from bookstore and institutional administrators.”

Libraries Gets Question on Senior Exit Exam

Libraries Gets Question on Senior Exit Exam

This fall, when graduating seniors take their standardized exit exam, one question will be added to probe their satisfaction with their experiences in the MSU Libraries. We thank Grace Jackson-Brown for leading the effort to get this question added to the Senior Exit Exam.

With input received from MSU library faculty and staff, and the MSU RStats Institute, listed below is the question that was devised for the Senior Exit Exam.  
 
The MSU Libraries provide books, media, databases, services, and study spaces to help students with research.
How valuable were MSU libraries while you were a student at MSU?
5 Very valuable
4 Valuable
3 Somewhat valuable
2 A little valuable
1 Not particularly valuable
 
Check all the library areas that apply to your answer:
Books
Media
Databases
Services
Study Spaces
Meyer Library Renovation Project Updates

Meyer Library Renovation Project Updates

  • Photo of a Fit Desk in the MSU Meyer LibraryThe final shipments of furniture for the new RIS Commons in the northeast area of the First Level should arrive and begin being assembled on Friday, August 4th. Installation should be complete by Tuesday, August 7th.
  • Re-carpeting of the southwest area of the Second Level (“the Wedge”) should begin within the next two weeks, but the exact start date is not yet known. This project should take approximately one week to complete.
  • Terry Rowland, who has served as coordinator on many renovation projects, plans to retire later this summer. We wish Terry the best in his retirement.
  • The Space Committee (Bennett, Neuschwander, Stout, and Peters) have held several planning meetings with interior designers and suppliers to develop entirely new furnishing plans for the main lobby as well as the Wedge in the southwest area of the Second Level. Plans will be shared soon with all library employees, as well as others, for review and comment. The goal is to completely replace the furnishings in these two areas between the end of the fall semester in December and the beginning of the spring semester in January.
Special Collections Spotlight: Labor Union Charters

Special Collections Spotlight: Labor Union Charters

image of a Labor Union CharterThe Labor Union Charters Collection (LA 29) in Special Collections and Archives contains forty-three charters and certificates of affiliation for various local labor unions, the oldest dating back to 1884.  The majority of the documents are from Springfield, but there are a few from other Missouri communities, like Joplin and Jefferson City, as well as Wichita and Parsons, Kansas.  The most decorative of the collection is suitably the 1932 charter for Springfield’s Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America.

Also among the collection are charters from local women’s auxiliaries, such as this 1950 certificate for the Women’s Auxiliary of the American Federation of Grain Millers Local Union No. 52 of Springfield, which also declares in bold lettering, “Prosperity Makes Tyrants, Adversity Makes Slaves.”

All of these documents can be viewed and searched online in our Digital Collections.

Keep Watching OzarksWatch Magazine

Keep Watching OzarksWatch Magazine

Postcard of the Lily Tulip Cup BuildingThe new editorial and production team for OzarksWatch Magazine, a twice-yearly serial publication of the Ozarks Studies Institute (OSI), part of the MSU Libraries, is now in place.  In August Rachel Besara, our new Associate Dean of Library Services, will become the Editor of OzarksWatch, as well as Director of the OSI.

Susan Croce Kelly will become the Managing Editor. She has been a newspaper reporter in Springfield and St. Louis, an award-winning columnist in Texas, public relations executive in St. Louis and Chicago, worked in Belgium and England, was founder and publisher of Ozarks Magazine, and has been president of her own corporate writing business for the past 20 years. Kelly is also the author of two award-winning books about the early days of US Highway 66, and was the recipient of Springfield’s John T. Woodruff Award in 2015.

Nathan Neuschwander will continue as the Design Editor. Tom Peters will become the Executive Editor. The target month for publishing the next issue of OzarksWatch Magazine, which probably will contain several articles about the upcoming bicentennial of Henry Schoolcraft’s perambulations in the semi-alpine region now known as the Ozarks, as well as other articles and features, is November.

Good Read: CHE on 21st Academic Libraries

Good Read: CHE on 21st Academic Libraries

Selfie taken by Shannon NajmabadiThe Chronicle of Higher Education recently ran an article by Shannon Najmabadi on what 21st century academic and research libraries are beginning to look like. Long-term print retention solutions are being implemented, and new services, such as Genius Squad counters (for tech support), Scholar’s Labs, and more are being implemented. New types of events are being held in libraries, such as job preparation nights.

“Now, with information always a few taps away, libraries have had to carve out a new niche. They’ve done so by pivoting away from books and toward supporting students. Institutions across the country have moved books off-site to make way for study spaces, “Maker” labs, and nap pods.”

The article also has gained attention because some readers have noted that all but one librarian interviewed and quoted were males.

Special Collection Spotlight: June Runk Brass Rubbings

Special Collection Spotlight: June Runk Brass Rubbings

Image of a brass rubbingLarge rubbings from English Monumental Brasses make up the June Runk Brass Rubbings Collection (M 45).  MSU alum June Runk, who lived in Suffolk County, England, from 1972-1976 while her husband served in the U.S. Air Force, created the rubbings.  Along with other military wives, she would approach a church vicar and secure permission to make a rubbing of the brasses in a church, sometimes paying a small fee.  Mrs. Runk used velveteen paper and a silver or gold wax crayon, taping the paper over the brass, then rubbing the crayon over the paper-covered effigy.  She worked four or five hours making each of the larger rubbings.  Since 1976, the British government has restricted the making of rubbings because the brasses were becoming too worn.
English Monumental Brasses, a popular means of honoring the dead from 1272 through the late 17th century, are generally grouped in three periods: the first (1272-1399), the second (1399-1509), and the third period (1509-late 17th century).  The collection includes rubbings from all three periods: from the first period, two life-size knights; from the second period, 10 dry mounted figures and two rolled; and from the third period, 10 dry mounted figures and three rolled.
2020 Vision Plan: Digitization Lab

2020 Vision Plan: Digitization Lab

Photo of the MSU Digitization Lab
MSU Libraries’ Digitization Lab

What the 2020 Plan States: “Digitization Lab: Develop a full-scale, full-time Digitization Lab, in which library personnel digitize materials and objects on a daily basis, and also offer high-end digitization services to users and allied groups.”

What’s HappeningThe Digitization Lab is now fully in operation with two oversize scanners (one of which can also scan transparencies up to 12.2” x 16.5”), one full-size scanner that can also scan transparencies, a document scanner, a 360-degree photo capture unit, a station for audio cassette digitization, and an upcoming station for VHS tape digitization, funded through a Summer Innovation grant.  Over 2.5 FTE employees work in the lab, along with several student assistants.  Current projects include the McCann Ozarks Folk Music Collection, the Oscar Carter Collection, the Route 66 Oral History Collection, the OzarksWatch Magazine Collection, the Missouri State University Historical Photograph Collection, the Cheryl Burnett Lady Bears VHS Collection, the Milton Rafferty Slide Collection, and the “Country Classics: Stories Behind the Songs” Collection. The lab is working with a multitude of formats, including audio cassette tapes, glass plate and film negatives, 35 mm slides, VHS tapes, documents, printed photos, and more.

Testing Center Additions and Improvements

Testing Center Additions and Improvements

Photo of the entrance to the MSU Testing CenterThe Testing Center is pleased to announce the following additional testing opportunities for Missouri State University students and members of the Missouri State community – as of June, 2017, the Testing Center is a “fully funded” DSST (DANTES) testing center, which means we can offer DSST exams to military members and their spouses at no cost to them.  In addition, we have added Kryterion and the University of London as exam clients.  This increases testing opportunities by at least 300 exam sponsors.  In addition, the Testing Center is now offering Pearson VUE exams evenings and weekends.

Recent Employee Publications

Recent Employee Publications

Cover of the Spring 2017 issue of OzarksWatch MagazineAbbey Waterworth, a student assistant in Special Collections and Archives, had an article published in the Spring 2017 issue of OzarksWatch Magazine, a publication of the Ozarks Studies Institute at MSU. The article is about Nick Sibley and Ruell Chappell, two long-time icons of the Springfield music scene. Abbey often performs with Nick and Ruell as, you guessed it, Nick, Ruell, and Abbey.

Tom Peters, Dean of Library Services, had two articles published in the Spring 2017 issue of OzarksWatch magazine. One is about the Weaver Brothers and Elviry, a group that had a very successful hillbilly variety show in the national and international vaudeville circuit, as well as on the silver screen. The other is about the Ozark Jubilee, the live, nationally broadcast television show that emanated from the Jewell Theater in downtown Springfield from 1955 to 1960.

Nathan Neuschwander did an excellent job of designing this issue of OzarksWatch.