Chris Bono: Student Employee of the Month for October

Chris Bono: Student Employee of the Month for October

Photo of Chris BonoMeet MSU Libraries’ Student Employee of the Month, Chris Bono!

Works in: Meyer Library’s Special Collections and Archives

Major: History

Favorite Book: There Will Come Soft Rains by Ray Bradbury

Something students should know about the libraries: “The Bear C.L.A.W. will be your best friend when writing anything for class. Use them as much as possible!”

Marilyn McCroskey co-authors article in Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

Marilyn McCroskey co-authors article in Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

Photo of Marilyn McCroskeyMarilyn McCroskey, Head of the Cataloging Unit at the MSU Libraries, is one of six co-authors of an article that recently was published in Cataloging & Classification Quarterly. Marilyn explains, “This was part of my work with the Library of Congress CIP [Cataloging-in-Publication] Advisory Group’s CIP Data Block Committee. I have represented AASL on the CIP Advisory Group since 2000. Cataloging-in-Publication (found on title page verso) had remained a “catalog card” format since 1971. Since libraries don’t use catalog cards any more,  LC thought the CIP format and content should be reconsidered. We surveyed catalogers in different types of libraries to get their input on what changes they would like to see. Schools and small public libraries use the CIP block when cataloging, while larger libraries are members of a bibliographic utility such as OCLC and don’t need it so much. The CIP changes were made with school and public libraries in mind. A second survey after the changes to CIP showed that those changes were very beneficial to the principal users. This article describes the process the committee followed to change the CIP block from a catalog card to a labeled format. My role was background research for the literature survey section, and extensive editing, rather than writing.”

E-Resource Spotlight: SIRS Researcher

E-Resource Spotlight: SIRS Researcher

SIRS e-resource bannerSIRS Researcher is a highly-acclaimed general reference database containing thousands of full-text articles exploring social, scientific, health, historic, business, economic, political and global issues. Articles and graphics are carefully selected from 2,000 domestic and international publications according to strict criteria with regard to content and age appropriateness. Thousands of hand-selected, authoritative newspaper and magazine articles, graphics, charts, maps, primary sources, government documents, websites, multimedia, as well as critical thinking questions, and timelines help broaden student comprehension of each topic. Users can easily retrieve information by Subject Heading, Topic Browse and Keyword searches. Items can be printed, saved, e-mailed, and now sent to Google Drive. Analysis and opinions cover the pros, cons, and everything in between of over 345 current issues. Editorially created content with engaging Essential Questions with answers, and viewpoint articles help build solid foundations for understanding complex global issues.

MSU Libraries and SGCLD Team Up to Fight Fake News

MSU Libraries and SGCLD Team Up to Fight Fake News

Photo of Tracy Stout
Tracy Stout
Photo of Jessica Bennett
Jessica Bennett

The MSU Libraries and the Springfield-Greene County Library District are collaborating to help citizens fight fake news. A hands-on class to help people to hone their skills to evaluate news stories and to protect themselves against fake news will be offered twice by Tracy Stout and Jessica Bennett, library science faculty members at MSU. Tracy is Head of the Research and Instructional Services (RIS) Unit, and Jessica is a reference and e-learning library faculty member in RIS. They will provide a step-by-step process for assessing the credibility of information, with many tips and practical advice.

The class will be offered twice in the coming weeks:

  1. Thursday, October 12 at 7:00 p.m. in the Harrison Room of The Library Center on South Campbell Avenue. To register, call 417-883-5341.
  2. Wednesday, November 1 at 7:00 p.m. in the Auditorium in The Library Center. Registration opens on October 23rd. To register, call 417-883-5341.
Native Art of the Americas Exhibit Open

Native Art of the Americas Exhibit Open

Please join us on Wednesday, October 18, from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. in Special Collections and Archives (Meyer Library 306) as students, faculty, and supporters responsible for the “Native Art of the Americas” exhibit gather for an opening reception.

Featuring art and artifacts from throughout the Americas, this exhibit reflects the research and interpretation of Dr. Billie Follensbee’s advanced art history students from the 2016-2017 courses ART 385: Art of the Americas and ART 485: Art of Mesoamerica. In these integrated Citizenship and Service-Learning classes, the students worked with objects on loan from the Ralph Foster Museum, the History Museum on the Square, the Zinn collection, the Ballweg collection, and the Hernandez collection, as well as other private collections.

This event is free and open to the public.

Special Collections and Archives in Meyer Library is pleased to support Dr. Follensbee and her students by providing study space and conservation facilities, as well as developing the current exhibit showcasing the students’ work.

For more information or to receive a visitor parking permit for that day, contact Special Collections at Archives@missouristate.edu or 417.836.5428.

The exhibit continues through January 19, 2018.

Jami Lewis is the New Archivist for the SHSMO Springfield Research Center

Jami Lewis is the New Archivist for the SHSMO Springfield Research Center

Photo of Jami LewisPlease join us in welcoming Jami Lewis to Meyer Library.  Jami is the new archivist with the State Historical Society of Missouri Research Center in Springfield.  She joins Erin Smither in preserving and providing access to the archival collections of the Society.  Prior to accepting this position, Jami was the archivist for the History Museum on the Square.  She also serves as a Community Scholar through the Missouri Folk Art Program, is active with the Lawrence County Historical Society, and has been an independent contractor on projects ranging from grant writing to genealogical research. To learn more about Missouri State University’s cooperative arrangement with the State Historical Society of Missouri, visit http://libraries.missouristate.edu/SHSMO.htm.  Jami’s contact information is lewisjami@shsmo.org or 417.836.3782.  The SHSMO office is located in Special Collections and Archives (Room 306).

Hillbilly Hellraisers Coming to Duane G. Meyer Library

Hillbilly Hellraisers Coming to Duane G. Meyer Library

Cover Art for the book Hillbilly HellraisersJ. Blake Perkins, the author of the new book, Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Defiance in the Ozarks, will give a talk about his book beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, October 23, 2017, in Room 107 on the First (Main) Level of Duane G. Meyer Library on the campus of MSU. The talk is free and open to all members of the campus community and the general public. After his talk, copies of his book will be available to purchase and have signed by the author, and refreshments will be served.

Perkins uses in-depth microhistories about moonshining, draft evasion during WW I, resistance to tick eradication programs for cattle, resistance to large federally-funded dams in the White River basin, and resistance to the War on Poverty to explore the roots of rural defiance in the Arkansas Ozarks, and to discover how the resistance was very nuanced and changed over time. More often than not, the real struggle was not between Ozarkers and outside federal agents, but between local elites, who usually lived in town, and poor yeomanry, who eked out a living in the hollers and river bottoms. It really was an intra-regional conflict about economic opportunities to be encouraged and supported by federal policies and financial support in the region, especially agriculture.

Perkins, a native of the Arkansas Ozarks, is an assistant professor of history at Williams Baptist University in Walnut Ridge, Arkansas.

Lisa McEowen Featured in the Sept. 2017 Issue of MO Info

Lisa McEowen Featured in the Sept. 2017 Issue of MO Info

Photo of Lisa McEowenLisa McEowen, Library Associate III in Special Collections and Archives at the Missouri State University Libraries, was the Featured Library Employee in a full-page spread on page seven of the September 2017 issue of MO Info, a publication of the Missouri Library Association.  When asked why she became a library employee, Lisa noted that, since her days as a student assistant in Cataloging, ” I appreciated the vast array of subjects represented in the various collections and have always enjoyed connecting people with things they know they are interested in as well as introducing them to potential new interests.” She loves the university and the library because lifelong learning is supported and encouraged every day. Lisa enthusiastically accepts the many challenges and opportunities that technological improvements have presented over the last two decades. Marilyn McCroskey, the Head of the Cataloging Unit, has been one of Lisa’s mentors, because “she presented a solid foundation for my learning and growth in the field, and continues to keep in touch and support me.” Asked about her current reading and viewing habits, Lisa noted, “I’m a huge fan of foreign crime dramas, so I have just finished Shetland (set in the Shetland Islands of Scotland and based on the Shetland novels by Ann Cleeves) and Hotel Beau Séjour (a Belgian supernatural crime series). Presently, I am a couple of episodes into the Finnish crime series Bordertown, about a detective inspector who moves his wife, a recent cancer survivor, and daughter to a small town in hopes of a slower pace of life—not to be had.” Congratulations, Lisa!

E-Resource Spotlight: Draw It to Know It

E-Resource Spotlight: Draw It to Know It

Draw It to Know It logoDraw It To Know It facilitates understanding of the structure of human neuroanatomy. The database contains four principal components: tutorials, slides, a brain atlas, and muscle-nerve illustrations. The tutorials and slides focus on 24 subsections of overall human neuroanatomy, each containing approximately a half dozen further sub-divisions, allowing users to drill down to very specific areas and functionalities. In the tutorial section, a voice-over describes specific structures, simultaneously drawing and labeling them. The slide section provides a progressive outline of the drawings withlabels which users can operate forward or back at their own pace. The third component, the brain atlas, allow users to view cross sections of human neuroanatomy in forty different areas using data drawn from reliable scientific publishers such as Elsevier, Thieme, Springer, and Oxford. The muscle-nerve component provides a schematic of specific muscle nerve interaction along with labeled anatomical photographs to illustrate the area under discussion. The full-time team of Draw It To Know It consists of PhD and MD educators, editors, and artists that work closely together to create content that is comprehensive, yet told through a simple instructive-style narrative.

Robots Invade Duane G. Meyer Library

Robots Invade Duane G. Meyer Library

Burger and Waffle TurtleBot3sWell, not really. We intentionally ordered these robots.

Seven TurtleBot3s – 5 Burgers and 2 Waffles (Sounds like a late lunch order, with a shake) — will become part of the library’s list of items that students and faculty can check out through Circulation.  Using summer innovation grant funds and working with Professor Anthony Clark for guidance on robots that would be useful to Computer Science, Engineering, and Physics, we were able to purchase these seven bots.

Professor Anthony Clark, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, noted, “I will be using the TurtleBot3s in both undergraduate and graduate courses. Students will learn complex theoretical concepts in class and will have an opportunity to put them into practice with these very capable devices. These robots will provide a great opportunity for our students to learn skills that will be in high demand in the coming years.”

The Robotis website notes, “The goal of TurtleBot3 is to drastically reduce the size and lower the price of the platform without sacrificing capability, functionality, and quality. Optional parts such as chassis, computers and sensors are available, and TurtleBot3 can be customized in various ways. TurtleBot3 is willing to be in the center of the maker movement by applying the latest technical advances of the SBC(Single Board Computer), the Depth sensor and 3D printing technology. TurtleBot3 is a collaboration project among Open Robotics, ROBOTIS, and more partners like Intel, Onshape, OROCA. The Open Robotics is in charge of software and community activities, while ROBOTIS is in charge of manufacturing and global distribution.”